Storytelling – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 06:23:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://stetmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Storytelling – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ 32 32 Blue Heron Ghost Train Rolls Next Week | Lifestyles https://stetmagazine.com/blue-heron-ghost-train-rolls-next-week-lifestyles/ https://stetmagazine.com/blue-heron-ghost-train-rolls-next-week-lifestyles/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 04:14:09 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/blue-heron-ghost-train-rolls-next-week-lifestyles/ September is a great time to experience traditional storytelling in the Big South Fork National Recreation and River Area. Watch on Facebook or YouTube starting next Saturday for the 11th Annual Blue Heron Ghost Train. Talented local storytellers Beth Kilburn, Jim Buck, Robert Stephens, Lounicia Hughett and Jordan Hughett will share, through the centuries-old tradition […]]]>

September is a great time to experience traditional storytelling in the Big South Fork National Recreation and River Area. Watch on Facebook or YouTube starting next Saturday for the 11th Annual Blue Heron Ghost Train. Talented local storytellers Beth Kilburn, Jim Buck, Robert Stephens, Lounicia Hughett and Jordan Hughett will share, through the centuries-old tradition of oral creation, their chilling stories from across the region.

The First Storyteller will perform on Saturday, September 11 at 8 p.m. ET with a different storyteller who will entertain you each night until Wednesday, September 15. Hear spooky tales of the hills and hollows of the Cumberland Plateau, experience the beauty of Kentucky, and the loneliness of Blue Heron & Mine-18, all from the comfort of your own home via the park’s Facebook page or YouTube channel.

Want to meet the storytellers of the Blue Heron Ghost Train? Join them on Saturday, September 11 at 6 p.m. ET at the Blue Heron Depot for a one-hour program. Bring a lawn chair and your favorite snack and get ready to be entertained with a variety of short stories.

For more information, please call the Bandy Creek Visitor Center at 423-286-7275.


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Have your books signed by the authors SHRM21 https://stetmagazine.com/have-your-books-signed-by-the-authors-shrm21/ https://stetmagazine.com/have-your-books-signed-by-the-authors-shrm21/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 02:21:28 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/have-your-books-signed-by-the-authors-shrm21/ Simultaneous speakers signing their books will do so in the SHRMStore. Keynote speakers will have their book autographed outside the general session area. September 9 2:10 p.m .: Janine Kurnoff, co-founder and chief innovation officer at The Presentation Company and author of Telling everyday business stories; Lisa I. Perez, SHRM-SCP, Founder and Chairman of HBL […]]]>

Simultaneous speakers signing their books will do so in the SHRMStore. Keynote speakers will have their book autographed outside the general session area.

September 9

2:10 p.m .: Janine Kurnoff, co-founder and chief innovation officer at The Presentation Company and author of Telling everyday business stories; Lisa I. Perez, SHRM-SCP, Founder and Chairman of HBL Resources and author of The Complete Manager Makeover: Transforming people into human resources; Husband ryan, founder and CEO of Advancing Wellness and author of The Thriving Hive: How People-Centered Workplaces Drive Engagement and Fuel Results.

September 10

8:40 am: Robin lawton, leadership strategist at C3 Excellence Inc., whose books include Mastering Excellence: A Leader Guide to Aligning Strategy, Culture, Customer Experience, and Measures of Success; Eric M. Ellis, President and CEO of Integrity Development Corp. and author of Conversations about diversity.

10:05 am: Michael phelps, record-breaking Olympic swimmer and author of NOTo Limits: the will to succeed and below the surface.

11:40 am: Ira S. Wolfe, president of Success Performance Solutions and author of Recruiting in the age of googleization.

11:55 am: Steve gilland, motivational speaker, whose books include The icing on the cake: what adds value; Michel Baran, main partner and responsible for digital solutions at inQUEST and author of SSubtle acts of exclusion: how to understand, identify and stop microaggressions.

12:10 p.m .: Magic Cook, CEO of Magie Cook LLC and author of Conscious success.

2:40 p.m .: Jodi L. Brandstetter, Head of Talent Strategy at Lean Effective Talent Strategies and author of Rental by design; Chris P. Dyer, founder and CEO of PeopleG2 and author of Remote work: rethinking processes, practices and strategies for engaging a remote workforce; Bill Ericson, co-founder of Workforce Science Associates and author of No pegs, no holes:
The psychology of elite performance.

4:55 p.m .: Bob Kelleher, founder of The Employee Engagement Group, whose books include STRONGER THAN WORDS: 10 Practical Employee Engagement Steps That Drive Results; Lester S. Rosen, lawyer and CEO at Employment Screening Resources and author of The safe hiring manual.

5:10 p.m .: Barbara Anne Glanz, president of Barbara Glanz Communications, whose books include Exhausted, confused and ticked off! : The hope of a new start when the change has made you; Tina Marie Wohlfield, SHRM-SCP, Founder and Chief People Strategist at TIMAWO and author of STOP Collaborate and LISTEN — Develop impactful HR partnerships through collaboration.

September 11th

8:40 am: Alden M. Mills, executive coach, former Navy SEAL and author of Unstoppable teams.

10:15 am: Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., SHRM-SCP, Chairman and CEO of SHRM and author of RESET: A leader’s guide to working in times of upheaval.

12:10 p.m .: Karith foster, CEO of Inversity Solutions and author of You can be perfect or you can be happy.

12:25 p.m .: Steve gilland, see the September 10 list.

12:40 p.m .: Robert bug, president of Thor Projects and author of 28 books, including The six keys to confident change management: digital transformation success and more ; Terri Bogue, RN, COO at Thor Projects and co-author with Robert Bogue.

3:25 p.m .: Tamra Chandler, principal, E&Y and co-author of Feedback (and other dirty words): why we fear it, how to fix it; Britt Andreatta, CEO of 7th Mind Co., whose books include Wired to Grow: Harness the power of brain science to learn and master any skill; Laura Grealish, Senior Director, Personnel Consulting Services at E&Y and co-author of Comments (and other dirty words): why we are afraid of it, how to fix it.

3:40 p.m .: Raymond Lee, CEO of Career Minds Group and author of Pointing:, Stress Free guide to career transitions; Lester S. Rosen, see the September 10 list; Jeffrey Korzenik, economist and author of Untapped Talent: How Second Chance Hiring Works for Your Business and the Community.

4:55 p.m .: Andrea Herron, SHRM-SCP, senior HR director at WebMD and author of There is an elephant in your office.

5:10 p.m .: Steve garguilo, partner of Cultivate and co-author of SURGE: your guide to putting any idea into action; Greg Schwem, president of Comedy with a Byte and author of TThe road to success is through the salad bar.

September 12

10:25 am: Viviane’s blade, leadership and resilience expert at Experts in Growth Leadership Consulting, whose books include Ready for resilience: a leader’s guide to getting through relentless crises; Mark J. Carpenter, chief storyteller at Mindset Strategic Leadership and author of Master Storytelling: How to turn your experiences into stories that teach, direct and inspire; Christopher D. Lee, CHRO at William & Mary University, whose books include Performance Conversations: How to Use Questions to Coach Employees and Improve Productivity, and increase confidence (without ratings!); Tim Sackett, SHRM-SCP, President of HRU Technical Resources and author of The Talent Fix: A Leader Guide to Recruiting Great Talent; Tracy Butz Stock, founder and owner of Achieve Positive Outcomes and author of HOLY COW! How to create an amazing workplace that fosters passion, performance and prosperity; Richard Finnegan, CEO of C-Suite Analytics, whose books include The power of stay interviews.

11:50 am: Bert jacobs, co-founder of Life is Good and co-author of Life is good: the book.


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Certell launches the Poptential ™ social studies program which https://stetmagazine.com/certell-launches-the-poptential-social-studies-program-which/ https://stetmagazine.com/certell-launches-the-poptential-social-studies-program-which/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/certell-launches-the-poptential-social-studies-program-which/ INDIANAPOLIS, Aug 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Nonprofit Certell, Inc., has launched Poptential ™, a family of free social studies courses that combine pop culture media with engaging digital storytelling for effective and dynamic learning by today’s digital native students. Click to tweet. Poptential is the evolution of Certell’s popular online program used by more […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS, Aug 24, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Nonprofit Certell, Inc., has launched Poptential ™, a family of free social studies courses that combine pop culture media with engaging digital storytelling for effective and dynamic learning by today’s digital native students. Click to tweet.

Poptential is the evolution of Certell’s popular online program used by more than 28,000 teachers in 50 states. Courses available include American History, World History, US Government / Civics, and Economics.

“The potential is the natural progression for Certell as we develop new ways to reach today’s digitally savvy learners with a meaningful and entertaining curriculum,” said Frederic Fransen, CEO of Certell, Inc. “This approach has been shown to be effective in imparting knowledge and teaching students how to think critically.

According to a recent study by Project Tomorrow®, 90% of teachers using Poptential say it increases their effectiveness in the classroom, and 84% of students say pop culture references help them learn.

“Certell’s Poptential is a comprehensive and dynamic program that matches student interest and teacher goals,” said Andrew Jones, professor of social studies at Fishers High School, Fishers, Ind. “The correspondence between pop culture and timeless concepts makes this a victory for both of us. I have been well served by the teacher’s content and recommend it to others.

Poptential courses include everything instructors need to teach a subject, digitally accessible in one place, including lessons, eBooks, bell ringers, quizzes and tests, as well as pop culture materials. to make the lessons interesting and relevant to the students. Classes are standards-based and developed by social studies teachers.

Each course includes a teacher edition ebook and student edition ebooks. The teacher edition is organized by monthly units, weekly modules and daily lessons. The curriculum is set on school calendars and compatible with popular classroom apps.

The student edition includes video clips, audio clips, and reading assignments that are digestible and informative. Classes are designed so that students can read and use multimedia at home, then come to class ready to discuss.

Content is available through Certell’s PostPossible ™ platform, which allows students to access courses even in low bandwidth environments. PostPossible also provides teachers and administrators with real-time analytics on student learning to help teachers refine lessons and better understand each student’s progress.

Potential courses are available free at www.certell.org.

About Certell, Inc.
Certell is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization whose mission is to create informed and engaged citizens by supporting innovative teachers who disrupt the traditional civic education system. Certell is the creator of Poptential, a family of free social studies courses that combine pop culture media with engaging digital storytelling for effective and dynamic learning. Poptential is used by educators in all 50 states. For more information, visit certell.org or Twitter @CertellOrg.

For more information:

Linda Muskin, 847-432-7300
lmuskin@teamclarus.com

Mara Conklin, 847-340-6823
mconklin@teamclarus.com


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Marion Hill directs delicate and honest romantic drama https://stetmagazine.com/marion-hill-directs-delicate-and-honest-romantic-drama/ https://stetmagazine.com/marion-hill-directs-delicate-and-honest-romantic-drama/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 20:48:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/marion-hill-directs-delicate-and-honest-romantic-drama/ Ma Belle, My Beauty excels in its visual storytelling, which blends beautifully with a lively acoustic score and talented actors. Idella Johnson and Hannah Pepper are exceptional and are very well suited to bringing writer-director Marion Hill’s vision to life for My beautiful, my beautiful. Johnson in particular is breathtaking and one to watch. A […]]]>

Ma Belle, My Beauty excels in its visual storytelling, which blends beautifully with a lively acoustic score and talented actors.

Idella Johnson and Hannah Pepper are exceptional and are very well suited to bringing writer-director Marion Hill’s vision to life for My beautiful, my beautiful. Johnson in particular is breathtaking and one to watch. A real star in the making. The film itself is lovely. It’s not quite perfect, but it’s still a sumptuous little indie that makes good use of the French countryside. My beautiful, my beautiful excels in its visual storytelling, which is beautifully paired with a lively acoustic score and talented actors.

Bertie (Johnson) is a beautiful and free-spirited woman with an angelic voice. Everything should be fine for her, but it isn’t. Currently living with her husband Fred (Lucien Guignard) in France, Bertie lost his illusions after the death of his mother and the disappearance of his partner Lane (Hannah Pepper). After collapsing on top of her and her husband’s group once more, Fred reaches out to Lane. As soon as Lane appears in the south of France, Bertie’s unresolved feelings ignite. Some of these feelings turn to jealousy when Lane meets an artist named Noa (Sivan Noam Shimon).


Related: CODA Review: Great Crowd Pleasure That Will Make You Laugh and Cry

The French countryside is beautifully captured in the film, the locals are lively and welcoming, and it seems like a dream to call this place home. Old houses and castle ruins scattered across the land tie viewers to a distant past that still clings to relevance. The noises of people chatting and laughing until late at night can pretty much lighten up anyone’s mood. Director Marion Hill does a lot with little to transport audiences to this place and be with these characters through effective visual storytelling and sound design. It’s like Hill is an integrated documentary maker in a bustling community and just saw an interesting story unfold on her camera. To this end, My beautiful, my beautiful is a slice-of-life story, which means viewers meet these characters well in their story and the film doesn’t have a solid conclusion, as audiences have immersed themselves in that moment to get a glimpse of what’s going on with Bertie. and her two lovers.

Hill does well not to force his audience to tell the story of this group. Informal conversations between the characters reveal that the three were in a polyamorous relationship – in particular, Bertie was dating Lane and Fred, who weren’t in love with each other. Although Lane and Fred never get romantic and remain in a platonic friendship, there is mutual respect. For those unfamiliar with polyamory, this is perhaps the simplest portrayal that doesn’t try to justify or judge any of these characters’ choices. Simply put, consenting adults can do whatever they want with other consenting adults, as long as the boundaries are respected. (Obviously there is a little more than that and you have to look for reliable sources to find out more if there are any questions).

What is beautiful about this film is the delicate and honest portrayal of people struggling with their emotions and not necessarily solving their problems the “right” way. A lot of people are Bertie, racking up difficult emotions, pulling back and not looking for help. Many are Fred, outsourcing help, trying to overcome any inconvenience with a smile on their face for the sake of those who matter to them. And a lot of people are Lane, just turning away, running away, and being somewhat reckless with other people’s feelings. My beautiful, my beautiful captures the difficulty of being there for others and dealing with challenges, large or small. This movie is not just a love story, it’s a love story.

The movie isn’t quite perfect, and that’s good. So much indicates that Hill is well on the way to becoming a sought-after filmmaker. However, the film lacks that little extra something. He could have used a little more dialogue, a little more action, and a little more complicated relationship drama just to reach his full potential. While the movie doesn’t quite stick to Landing, it goes beyond simply being a true description of the LGBTQ + experience, in a way that goes beyond the typical phase of self-discovery. . These characters are good in their lives as queer people, and their story isn’t all about the struggles of being queer. The film taps into what many queer narratives fail to do, which is to explore the very universal experiences that come with being a human with feelings.

The leaders are fully realized women, with a depth and spirit that are not constrained by traditional societal expectations. Hill’s intention is clear and her impact is deeply felt, so despite all of the narrative weaknesses, the film is mandatory for anyone looking for more positive, contemporary tales of queer women. My beautiful, my beautiful may have its flaws, but Hill makes up for it with a skillful hand in dealing with his depiction of depression, the complexity of relationships – in particular, a polyamorous relationship – and the feeling of being ostracized in a community unlike you. Hill’s film is authentic to the experiences of its characters, but is also an honest reflection of what many may feel and experience.

Next: Beckett Review: Washington Can’t muster Enough Charisma to Save a Dull Thriller

My beautiful, my beautiful opened in theaters on August 20, 2021 in Los Angeles and New York City, with an expansion on August 27. It lasts 93 minutes and is unrated.

Our assessment:

3.5 out of 5 (Very good)

  • My beautiful, my beautiful (2021)Release Date: August 20, 2021

Simu liu shang chi

Shang-Chi 2: Simu Liu says his MCU movie hints at a sequel



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‘Padmini of Malwa’ blurs the line between fiction and history. What does this mean for storytelling? https://stetmagazine.com/padmini-of-malwa-blurs-the-line-between-fiction-and-history-what-does-this-mean-for-storytelling/ https://stetmagazine.com/padmini-of-malwa-blurs-the-line-between-fiction-and-history-what-does-this-mean-for-storytelling/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/padmini-of-malwa-blurs-the-line-between-fiction-and-history-what-does-this-mean-for-storytelling/ “Believe it or not”, says Priyadarshi Thakur “Khayal” in his “autobiography” of Rani Ruupmati, Padmini from Malwa, “This is really Rani Ruupmati’s autobiography, I just wrote down what she told me.” History says that Rani Ruupmati poisoned herself to death in 1561. Thakur would disagree with the suggestion that the “autobiography” arose in his imagination. […]]]>

“Believe it or not”, says Priyadarshi Thakur “Khayal” in his “autobiography” of Rani Ruupmati, Padmini from Malwa, “This is really Rani Ruupmati’s autobiography, I just wrote down what she told me.” History says that Rani Ruupmati poisoned herself to death in 1561.

Thakur would disagree with the suggestion that the “autobiography” arose in his imagination. In “The Scribe’s Note” he writes: “I am aware that there will be few takers for what must be declared my ‘spiel’ …”. Thakur weaves the story of Ruupmati’s story by transcribing visions where she tells him about her life. While this is literary vanity, this method shapes the novel in a way where the scribe and reader are both listeners.

But unlike the reader, the scribe often interrupts the narration. “What can I say, simple scribe?” He asks when she admits that she can’t remember certain details from her childhood. Ruupmati, as a character, admits his possible biases and identifies what a cynical listener would choose, explaining himself in every part of the novel.

Similar to conversations where a participant plugs the holes in their account, this excessive explanation serves as clarification. But he whispers another reason: All women, even the Queen of Malwa, are supposed to explain themselves. Thakur’s characterization forces Ruupmati to crumble but allows him to redeem himself for any wrongdoing, fabricating the vulnerability that accompanies an autobiography.

“My dear scribe, you must be thinking what a stupid, ungrateful and suspicious mistress I was for a faithful companion like Nayla, but remember I was just a fifteen year old girl who had gone through so many ups and downs. low in her short life. I had been cheated so often that I trusted no one but my beau and I was determined not to share the slightest bit of her affection with anyone.

The male gaze

Thakur’s writing of the novel as a transcription of an unbalanced conversation resists “showing,” wielding language like a cunning swordsman. When the reader accesses one-on-one that they’re not part of, Ruupmati admits that she used to listen to her family after her father started looking for a husband for her. By “telling”, Thakur thickens the uncertainty that clouds the mind of a woman whose decisions are beyond her reach. But saying begets showing. In the novel, they coexist as roommates who don’t bicker and talk like friends.

Example: the character of Rao Yaduveer Singh Parbhar. Thakur draws him as the father Ruupmati ends up loving but with whom he disagrees. He ignites the hypocrisy of his fatherhood. When a man accuses his daughter of fornication, Parbhar prepares to “sacrifice” her (read: murder) for the honor of the family, but when she lives with her lover, who happens to be a Muslim king, the Hindu in him decides that she is in “captivity” and requests her “return” through Rani Durgawati. When the abuser tries to become a self-proclaimed savior, Thakur “shows” how ideas of gender and religion swirl in politics.

Baz Bahadur, the king of Malwa and the husband of Ruupmati, further exposes these ideas when he recognizes the word “wife” as an “offensive word”. The dialogue slips scribbled notes with this derogation when Ruupmati reproaches herself for feeling annoying under the gaze of Bhaunda and her sister Ketki, Ruupmati’s foster mother.

Thakur shows how this look facilitates the concept of “izzat” and benefits men. When Bhaunda finds Ruupmati’s ustad Revadiya making an unsolicited advance – and lashes out at Parbhar, his obsession with her removes its veil of affection. While the novel doesn’t erase the impact of the gaze, it crushes it when Baz compares him and Ruupmati to Khilji and Padmini. He does not recognize the terror that chaperones the analogy.

“… Did Alauddin Khilji get Rani Padmini for all the problems he had?” “
“No, she committed a jauhar. “
Before I could say anything more, Baz said, ‘But I have my Padmini quietly …’ “

The scribe’s strategy

But the character of Baz sometimes unwinds the tape of masculinity that plays out in everyday life. The language allows him to recognize his wife as an equal, and their marriage moves away from the formality of the “aap” to approach the intimate “tum”. Unfortunately, the toxic masculinity marinade sticks to Baz, and he watches Ruupmati when he tells her not to turn her eyes to Suuli Bardi, a public execution site, days after seeing him behead two disloyal subjects.

Their marriage occupies the throne of the novel as it is the means by which Thakur controls the elements of the narrative. One of these elements is the poetry that stains Ruupmati’s transcription, allowing the reader to become a voyeur of the amorous language between her and her husband.

But Baz is also a king, and a Muslim in addition, who loves his Hindu wife. This forces poetry to expand to the other end of the canonical idiom until it becomes a hateful tool for fabricating rumors that mock the love between Ruupmati and her husband.

Black magic made the bad guys
Rani perform
And dry-sapped
The manly form of our beloved sultan;
She summoned clouds
And made them pour in a snap
Of the daggers that she watched her jump
And made it burn
Our poor innocent Baz has finally been
Consumed by the witch’s curse –
foolish heart … my foolish heart
We have nothing to do with it, however
He got married and brought on his own
His mortal enemy!
For sure, for sure
Poor Baz has been devoured
By that dirty whore.

An additional element is the scribe’s interruptions. Thakur, as a scribe and a character, sheds the skin of the writer. He feigns humility when he describes himself as a “mere scribe” while constantly disrupting the flow of Ruupmati’s transcript as a biased researcher.

The italicized portions of the humblebrag dissociate the story from its preferred identity of “autobiography”. But what’s most annoying about these interruptions is how they fail to intervene when Ruupmati blames herself for the actions of those around her, leaving her as helpless as she was in her life. his childhood. When the interruptions are scrawled on the transcript, they recognize its beauty and royalty. While this reassures Ruupmati, it doesn’t do much for the story itself.

“My dear scribe, you must be even more astonished now, a lover of twenty-six and a beloved of barely eighteen talking to each other on such complex matters! Yes sir, they did it because they were Sultan Baz Bahadur and Rani Ruupmati. They were talking about such things. This is precisely the reason why people have not stopped talking about it even after five centuries.

She smiled and disappeared, leaving me wondering how she guessed what I was thinking!

Padmini from Malwa adds foam to the wait for an autobiography. He slips between the cracks of history and fiction. In doing so, he could become the harbinger of a new form or the destroyer of an old one.

Padmini of Malwa: The Autobiography of Rani Ruupmati, as Priyadarshi Thakur ‘Khayal’ said, Speaking Tiger.


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Narratio Fellows learn the art of storytelling through poetry and photography https://stetmagazine.com/narratio-fellows-learn-the-art-of-storytelling-through-poetry-and-photography/ https://stetmagazine.com/narratio-fellows-learn-the-art-of-storytelling-through-poetry-and-photography/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 23:18:19 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/narratio-fellows-learn-the-art-of-storytelling-through-poetry-and-photography/ The 2021-22 cohort of Narratio Fellows and their mentors on the steps of Hendricks Chapel. Nineteen refugee youth from central New York recently completed an intensive four-week storytelling and leadership workshop on the college campus and North Side Learning Center in the city of Syracuse. This marked a milestone for the Narratio scholarship as it […]]]>

The 2021-22 cohort of Narratio Fellows and their mentors on the steps of Hendricks Chapel.

Nineteen refugee youth from central New York recently completed an intensive four-week storytelling and leadership workshop on the college campus and North Side Learning Center in the city of Syracuse. This marked a milestone for the Narratio scholarship as it was the largest class in the program to date.

Launched in 2019 by Brice Nordquist, Associate Professor of Writing, Rhetoric, and Composition Studies and Dean’s Professor of Community Engagement at the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S), and Iraqi-American author, poet and social entrepreneur Ahmed Badr, the Narratio Fellowship provides young refugees in the Syracuse region with opportunities to explore and represent a full range of their own stories and experiences through artistic expression. By sharing their stories in a way that is authentic and meaningful to them, fellows are able to show the world that they are not just defined by their travel experience.

While in previous years, fellows each explored a specific medium of storytelling (poetry in 2019 and filmmaking in 2020), this year’s program has been expanded, allowing each fellow to study poetry or photography.

“We were delighted to increase the size of our classes and offer more programming options,” explains Nordquist. “This year, we were able to welcome scholarship recipients from more schools, more community centers and different neighborhoods in the region. It is the most regionally diverse group of fellows we have ever had.

The larger cohort is a welcome sight for organizers after COVID-19 security protocols forced them to reduce last year’s group to six from the inaugural class, which was made up of 11 fellows. The 2021 cohort, selected through an application process, includes Fowler High Schools Henninger, Nottingham, West Genesee and PSLA scholars; Ihsan School of Excellence; Onondaga Community College and Syracuse University.

Nordquist says a key to expanding the program was their partnership with National Geographic, which provided the scholarship with funding and connected Narratio with Vision workshops, an organization that partners with National Geographic to provide educational experiences to young people around the world, with a focus on photography and self-expression.

For this summer’s program, photography cohort fellows worked with artists in residence Stefano Castro, who is a Colombian-American photographer, and National Geographic photographers Matt Moyer and Newhouse teacher Amy Toensing, both of which were brought in through the Vision Workshops.

Poetry Cohort Fellows worked with Khadija Mohamed, 2019 Narratio Fellow and Rising Junior in A&S, who guided the group through a storytelling project through poetry.

The scholarship will conclude with a trip to New York City later this fall, made possible through an ongoing collaboration with The Metropolitan Art Museum. This will be the stock exchange’s first visit to New York since 2019, when the inaugural class performed a poetry reading at the Met’s Ancient Near East Gallery. Last year all events were virtual due to the pandemic.

The 2021-2022 cohort of Narratio Fellows presented their poems and photographs during a preview at the White Branch Library in Syracuse on July 30.

In addition to showcasing their poems and photographs, the fellows worked closely with environmentalists and curators from the Met. While visiting the Met, they will spend time in labs learning how to repair, conserve, and rebuild items. Nordquist says this mix of science and engineering with the humanities caters to many of the cohort with dual interests in STEM and the arts.

This spring, the fellows will also exhibit and perform their work at an event related to the Syracuse Symposium at the Syracuse University Humanities Center.

The success of the Narratio Fellowship has caught the attention of organizations that support resettled refugees in other cities, including Richmond, Virginia and Houston, Texas. Later this year, Nordquist, Badr and a group of Narratio fellows will travel to Virginia to meet with a group called Re-Establish Richmond, which connects refugees and new immigrants with the resources needed to establish roots and build community. The Narratio team will run workshops for youth and explore the possibility of starting a Richmond cohort.

While Nordquist is excited about the prospect of nationwide expansion, he says expanding the program locally to involve more young refugees in central New York City is still a primary goal for the scholarship.

“We want to continue to build this network and structure in Syracuse where we get more organizations sharing projects and resources and more students across the city feel like they have this shared identity amid their complexities. unique, ”he says. “Investing in local students is the way to strengthen our community. “

the Storytelling scholarship is a collaboration of the North Side Learning Center, the College of Arts and Sciences Engaged Humanities Network and Narratio.org.


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Film festivals put Arkansas cinema in the spotlight https://stetmagazine.com/film-festivals-put-arkansas-cinema-in-the-spotlight/ https://stetmagazine.com/film-festivals-put-arkansas-cinema-in-the-spotlight/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 08:56:26 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/film-festivals-put-arkansas-cinema-in-the-spotlight/ A growing number of film festivals are attracting the attention of filmmakers in northwest Arkansas and could create more jobs supporting the state’s creative economy, organizers say. “What’s so interesting about cinema is that it’s not just an art, it’s business, it’s economic development, it’s tourism,” said Kathryn Tucker, Director executive of the Arkansas Cinema […]]]>

A growing number of film festivals are attracting the attention of filmmakers in northwest Arkansas and could create more jobs supporting the state’s creative economy, organizers say.

“What’s so interesting about cinema is that it’s not just an art, it’s business, it’s economic development, it’s tourism,” said Kathryn Tucker, Director executive of the Arkansas Cinema Society.

The company is a Little Rock-based nonprofit organization with a mission to build a film community in Arkansas. It seeks to connect moviegoers with each other and nurture new and existing cinematic talent within the state through increased exposure to filmmakers and their art. The creative economy includes artistic and cultural places and activities that contribute to the global economy.

Arkansas is home to approximately 15 annual film festivals, including several in Northwest Arkansas: the Fayetteville Film Fest, which began in 2009; the Ozark Media Arts Festival in Springdale, which began in 2013; and the Bentonville Film Festival, which began in 2015. A 16th festival, the Rogers Short Film Festival, will debut on August 21 with the intention of being an annual event.

The weeklong Bentonville event wrapped up on Sunday, as Fort Smith prepares for its inaugural festival Friday and Saturday.

“Having these festivals here helps raise awareness of Arkansas and what is possible in Arkansas,” said Brandon Chase Goldsmith, co-founder of the River Valley Film Society and executive director of the Fort Smith International Film Festival. .

The festivals operate independently, Tucker said, but all contribute to the state’s creative economy through featured events and by raising awareness of filmmaking opportunities in Arkansas.

“It’s not just the festival itself, it is interested in all the veins that come out of the heart of our festival in the river valley but also in Northwest Arkansas and overall. state, ”Goldsmith said.

REGIONAL IMPACTS

The Hot Springs Documentary Film Festival will celebrate 30 years of programming October 8-16 and is North America’s oldest documentary film festival, said Jen Gerber, executive director.

The festival champions non-fiction storytelling by providing a platform for storytellers to entertain, educate and broaden perspectives, according to the festival’s website.

Diana Michelle, 46, of West Fork is currently filming “It’s No Secret” in Northwest Arkansas. She describes the film as a near-autobiographical docudrama about acute mental illness, deep healing, and the triumph of a life of struggle. The film follows the life of Paul Summerlin, a local musician and yogi, she said.

His film “Westland”, about reclusive artist Tim West, premiered at the Hot Springs Festival in 2014.

Attending local festivals helped bring attention to her career as a professional photographer and filmmaker, she said.

“There is more interest, there is more support and places to show our work,” Michelle said. “Things are looking up for the independent filmmaker. I want to embrace all of that.”

The impact of the Hot Springs Festival on the city’s economy is evident when the approximately 2,500 people who attend the event each year visit the city, Tucker said.

“Most of the hotels end up getting pretty full during our festival. The restaurants are really, really busy,” said Gerber. “We love it, we want it to happen. We love our city. We exist because of our city, so we want to be in this partnership with our city.”

The Bentonville Festival began in 2015 after the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opened in 2011.

“It was as if the entire industry across the region in terms of the creative economy had taken off,” Ashley Edwards, festival programming director, said of the time.

The 2021 festival featured around 78 films focusing on the underrepresented voices of various storytellers, said Nicole Kerr, event publicist.

Some 30,000 people attended the festival’s in-person and virtual events in 2020, she said.

“With the exception of 2020, which saw the world grapple with a health pandemic, Bentonville has hosted more and more events each year, which has been extremely beneficial to all of our local sites and businesses,” said said Kalene Griffith, President of Visit Bentonville.

Bentonville’s Skylight Theaters, which opened in 2017, has six screens and a capacity of 365 people, said Scott Gordon, general manager.

“The Bentonville Film Festival has always been an exciting time around downtown Bentonville and the great community of northwest Arkansas,” Gordon said, adding that festival film screenings usually sold out. closed.

Goldsmith said he expects 800 people to attend the inaugural Fort Smith Festival, which will feature more than 130 films celebrating the artistic expression and diverse experiences of Native Americans and people of color. Filmmakers from all over the world will come for the festival, he said.

“It’s a way to bring the world to the river valley, but at the same time, we get to showcase our regional talent to the world,” Goldsmith said.

ARKANSAS SHOOTING

The festivals create opportunities for filmmakers visiting the state to experience filming potential in Arkansas, Tucker said.

The national film and television industry generates $ 253 billion, provides 2.5 million jobs and contributes an average of $ 250,000 per year to the local economies of regions presented as filming locations, according to “The American Motion Picture and Television Industry: Job Creation, Trade Around the World, ”a report released by the Motion Picture Association of America in April.

Arkansas’ film and television industry is directly responsible for more than $ 150 million in wages and about 3,300 jobs per year, according to the report. Recent productions include films such as “Ghosts of the Ozarks”, https: //www.arkansasonline.com/news/2021/aug/09/film-festivals-put-arkansas-filmmaking-in-the/ “Freedom’s Path “and” 12 hour shift. “

Martin Lawrence, an actor who starred in films such as “Bad Boys” and “Blue Streak”, and Melissa Roxburgh, a “Star Trek Beyond” actress, were filming the movie “Mindcage” in Springdale and Fayetteville last week, said a representative with United Talent Agency.

The financial rewards of shooting a major movie in Arkansas can be attractive to filmmakers, Tucker said.

Film, television and other forms of production are eligible for a 20-30% discount on all production expenses if at least $ 200,000 is spent in the state or $ 50,000 is spent in the state. State for post-production within six months, according to the Arkansas Production Alliance website.

Georgia has a minimum spending of $ 500,000 for tax breaks for production filming, Tucker said, bringing some $ 80 billion to the state’s creative economy each year.

Marvel’s “Black Panther” was filmed in Georgia and involved more than 3,100 local workers who took in more than $ 26.5 million in wages, according to the Motion Picture Association of America report.

However, the smaller films that are getting a lot of national attention are low budget Oscar contenders such as “Nomadland” and “Minari,” which are well within Arkansas’ ability to support. she declared.

“We have the ability to claim some of these low budget projects while still keeping our local talent employed,” Tucker said. “I think we could fill this void for the domestic market.”

Part of that effort will continue to develop an experienced workforce in the state capable of meeting production demands, Edwards said.

“The number of jobs available to work as a team and behind the screen is just exponential, as long as we can bring these film productions here,” she said. “I just want the people of Arkansas to be able to work in the cinema and not have to move.”

The Bentonville and Fort Smith festivals both offer year-long programming to invest in local workforce development, organizers said.

Fort Smith is working with local stakeholders such as the Fort Smith Regional Chamber of Commerce to develop high school education programs and a business competition for high school and college students to promote local businesses, Goldsmith said.

“We can build a pipeline from high school to college to careers,” he said.

The Bentonville Festival is also working with the University of Arkansas and Northwest Arkansas Community College to develop film production programs to further pave the way for careers in film in the state, Edwards said.

Northwest Arkansas Community College offers a Certificate of Proficiency in Film Studies, according to the college’s website, with support classes that introduce students to theoretical, historical, and critical approaches to films.

Bentonville also created a production branch to produce films locally, Edwards said.

“We have 10,000 former filmmakers that we are going to be looking for,” she said of previous festival contributors and attendees. “We’re going to make movies here.”

Diana Michelle from Fayetteville keeps her eyes on her camera while recording Paul Summerlin from Fayetteville as he performs yoga poses on Wednesday July 28, 2021 at Wilson Park in Fayetteville. (NWA Democrat-Gazette / JT Wampler)

Diana Michelle from Fayetteville is getting ready to record Paul Summerlin from Fayetteville as he performs yoga poses on Wednesday July 28, 2021 at Wilson Park in Fayetteville.  (NWA Democrat-Gazette / JT Wampler)

Diana Michelle from Fayetteville is getting ready to record Paul Summerlin from Fayetteville as he performs yoga poses on Wednesday July 28, 2021 at Wilson Park in Fayetteville. (NWA Democrat-Gazette / JT Wampler)

Diana Michelle from Fayetteville sets up her camera to record Paul Summerlin from Fayetteville as he performs yoga poses on Wednesday July 28, 2021 at Wilson Park in Fayetteville.  (NWA Democrat-Gazette / JT Wampler)

Diana Michelle from Fayetteville sets up her camera to record Paul Summerlin from Fayetteville as he performs yoga poses on Wednesday July 28, 2021 at Wilson Park in Fayetteville. (NWA Democrat-Gazette / JT Wampler)

No more news

To agree

Tickets and passes for the Bentonville Film Festival are available at https://bentonvillefilm.org/tickets-passes/.

Fort Smith International Film Festival tickets are available at https://fortsmithfilm.com/.

Both festivals offer in-person and virtual programming.

Source: NWA Democrat-Gazette


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APPLICATIONS OPEN: Intensive 2021 Stories from Alaska Native Filmmakers for Climate Justice | Culture & Leisure https://stetmagazine.com/applications-open-intensive-2021-stories-from-alaska-native-filmmakers-for-climate-justice-culture-leisure/ https://stetmagazine.com/applications-open-intensive-2021-stories-from-alaska-native-filmmakers-for-climate-justice-culture-leisure/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 19:08:48 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/applications-open-intensive-2021-stories-from-alaska-native-filmmakers-for-climate-justice-culture-leisure/ Native Movement and UAF’s Department of Theater and Film are collaborating on a new intensive film opportunity, and applications are now being accepted for the Alaska Native Filmmaker Intensive: Stories for Climate Justice. This is an all-expenses-paid scholarship opportunity aimed at helping Alaska Native storytellers expand into digital media production. Applicants must be 18 years […]]]>

Native Movement and UAF’s Department of Theater and Film are collaborating on a new intensive film opportunity, and applications are now being accepted for the Alaska Native Filmmaker Intensive: Stories for Climate Justice. This is an all-expenses-paid scholarship opportunity aimed at helping Alaska Native storytellers expand into digital media production. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older, be native to Alaska, and willing to expand their storytelling skills. Applications are accepted until August 9, 2021. To apply, please visit: https://www.nativemovement.org/filmintensive

This first Alaskan Native Filmmaker Intensive will help Native Alaskan storytellers develop camera, sound, lighting and editing techniques. Participants will connect with expert filmmakers active in Indigenous media and lay the groundwork for future creative storytelling efforts.

The theme for this year’s session will be “Stories for Climate Justice”. We encourage all participants to reflect on their relationship to their homes, lands and cultures, as we adapt to climate change and fight to protect the communities we love most. Students will also receive trainings on climate justice, action and advocacy, while increasing their communication and narrative framing skills.

Participants will connect with Indigenous film professionals and have the opportunity to develop relationships with industry mentors. In addition, there will be film screening opportunities available to participants in a number of indigenous gatherings, from the local to the international level.

“As our Native Alaskan lifestyles continue to be threatened by catastrophic climate change, we see how imperative it is to tell our stories firsthand, but also to express our hope and the reasons for which we want to protect our native lands. From an industry perspective, there is growing interest in Alaska from filmmakers and outside media, and we want to strengthen our ability to tell our own stories. – Princess Daazhraii Johnson, faculty member of the Filmmakers Intensive program

PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE:

  • A monetary allowance
  • 3 UAF College credits (pass / fail course limited to acceptance into the program)
  • Cinematic skills
  • Access to professional filming equipment
  • Connections with media creation experts
  • Travel, accommodation and food costs covered during the Fairbanks in-person session

“We cannot serve Alaska without first focusing our efforts on the Alaskan storytellers. Our film program continues to nurture, support and produce content by Native Alaskan filmmakers for this purpose. This course will be a unique opportunity to dive deep into the filmmaking process with experts by your side. – Maya Salganek, Faculty Member of the Filmmakers Intensive / Associate Professor of Film and Video Arts, University of Alaska Fairbanks

“The real story of climate change is constantly obscured by industry interests, bipartisan politics and disinterest. The real story of the climate is a story of people. We are in a time of deep crisis and we who live closest to the earth are experiencing the realities of melting permafrost, rising temperatures and threatened livelihoods. It is time for our community voices to be raised, amplified and heard. – Ruth Miller, Indigenous Movement Climate Justice Director

Advertising and more information contact:

  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Department of Theater and Cinema
  • maya@alaska.edu
  • 907-388-1080

Dates for Alaska Native Filmmakers Intensive 2021

  • Virtual sessions: MWF from September 27 to October 8
  • In person (Fairbanks): Tuesday October 12 to Sunday October 17
  • * Travel, accommodation and food costs will be covered during the in-person session.

Additional partners in this program include: Vision Maker Media and the Nia Tero Foundation

Indigenous movement is an Alaskan Native American and Native American nonprofit organization. We are committed to developing the power of people, based on Indigenous values, for the health and well-being of Mother Earth and all of her living beings.

Department of Theater and Film, University of Alaska Fairbanks offers the only film and theater degree program in Alaska. We have produced over 15 feature films with filmmakers from across the country. Through teaching and production work, our department prepares students for professional success in the film and theater industries, while educating students from all disciplines in the foundational skills of collaboration, communication and performance. creativity.


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‘The L Word’ showrunner on advancing queer storytelling – The Hollywood Reporter https://stetmagazine.com/the-l-word-showrunner-on-advancing-queer-storytelling-the-hollywood-reporter/ https://stetmagazine.com/the-l-word-showrunner-on-advancing-queer-storytelling-the-hollywood-reporter/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 10:00:35 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/the-l-word-showrunner-on-advancing-queer-storytelling-the-hollywood-reporter/ Welcome to episode 131 of TV Top 5, Hollywood journalisttelevision podcast. Each week, hosts Lesley goldberg (publisher of West Coast TV) and Daniel Fenberg (Chief TV Reviewer) breaks down the latest TV news with context from the business and critical side, greets showrunners, executives and other guests, and provides a critical guide on what to […]]]>

Welcome to episode 131 of TV Top 5, Hollywood journalisttelevision podcast.

Each week, hosts Lesley goldberg (publisher of West Coast TV) and Daniel Fenberg (Chief TV Reviewer) breaks down the latest TV news with context from the business and critical side, greets showrunners, executives and other guests, and provides a critical guide on what to watch (or ignore, depending on the case).

The five topics for this week are:

1. Franchise growing pains.
This segment explores the trials and tribulations of three major franchises: that of Amazon the Lord of the Rings television series (which should bow in more than a year); peacock Fresh Prince of Bel-Air dramatic update (already on his third showrunner); and JJ Abrams The brilliant branching out, Neglect (soon in her second home) because making a splash with a familiar IP isn’t always the easiest route.

2. Mailbag!
In this frequent segment, Dan and I answer listeners’ questions. Topics include rock cop and how absurd shows get the green light; if Apple TV + is worth $ 5 / month; the status of The sandy ground Disney + TV show; and, yes, the state of Dangeris looking for a full time host. If you have any questions you would like to hear us discuss on future episodes, email us at TVsTop5@THR.com.

3. Not a but of them 900 million dollars in offers!
This week the South Park the creators have extended their overall deal with ViacomCBS for an estimated $ 900 million, which includes several renewals for the success of Comedy Central and 14 (!) films for Paramount +. The news comes days after Reese Witherspoon sold his production company Hello Sunshine for the same staggering sum to an investment group led by two former Disney executives. This segment explores both ends of the spectrum of the two agreements – why ownership matters, why being an independent studio in an age of walled gardens matters and more.

4. Spotlight on the showrunner.
Marja-Lewis Ryan join the show this week to discuss The L word: generation Q and how the rebirth of Showtime hopes to carry the torch of its groundbreaking original. Ryan talks about the challenges and changes to the drama in the wake of the pandemic and how she hopes to usher in the next wave of LGBTQ writers and showrunners with her new global contract at Showtime. Ryan also explains how she hopes season two of the show – returning Sunday on Showtime – will advance queer storytelling for other marginalized communities.

5. Critics’ corner.
As usual, each episode ends with Dan’s guide to what to watch (or skip) in the week ahead. This week it features Netflix reviews Hit & Run, FX on Hulu Reservation dogs, Apples Mr. Corman and more.

Listen to it all now on TV Top 5. Make sure you subscribe to the podcast so you never miss an episode. (Critics are welcome!)



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Washington Post Design Team Recruits https://stetmagazine.com/washington-post-design-team-recruits/ https://stetmagazine.com/washington-post-design-team-recruits/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 23:01:34 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/washington-post-design-team-recruits/ We’re a team of over 50 visual journalists passionate about storytelling and helping elevate the Washington Post’s most ambitious projects. What makes us unique: We’re news designers and art directors who are equally passionate about kerning and coding. print, digital and social platforms. In 2019, The Post was recognized as the world’s best-designed digital news […]]]>

We’re a team of over 50 visual journalists passionate about storytelling and helping elevate the Washington Post’s most ambitious projects. What makes us unique: We’re news designers and art directors who are equally passionate about kerning and coding. print, digital and social platforms.

In 2019, The Post was recognized as the world’s best-designed digital news experience by the Society for News Design, with the judges noting, “The newsroom’s approach to visual storytelling. . . pushes the boundaries of design and uses new technologies to tell compelling and important stories. Over the past six years, The Post has been a four-time finalist in the World’s Best Designed Newspaper competition.

The design department also aligns with our team of project writers who are responsible for the planning and execution of some of The Post’s most ambitious journals.

[The Post wins nearly 200 awards for Society for News Design digital and print competitions]

See some of the teams’ work

The designers of the Washington Post are charged with a variety of different roles. Below is a sample of their work.

follow us on Twitter and Instagram, where we regularly publish more of the team’s work.

Jobs

Design editor

The Washington Post is seeking a Design Editor to join our award-winning Design Department.

The Post’s designers play a pivotal role in our storytelling, informing decision-making about the optimal use of visuals, text, audio, and graphics in building transparent and compelling experiences for our readers. We’re looking for an editor who can guide designers as they work with colleagues in the newsroom to achieve best-in-class digital storytelling, and with the requisite powers of persuasion and diplomatic tact.

The ideal candidate should be able to react quickly to current events and foster collaboration. This person should have a sharp design aesthetic, an understanding of art direction, and the ability to elevate digital presentations. Development skills and previous management experience are a plus, as managing and mentoring staff are essential aspects of this job.

This editor will play a vital role in working in the newsroom to seek out opportunities for growth and experimentation.

This post is based in our Washington newsroom. Once we resume normal operations, it will no longer be eligible for remote work. Night and occasional weekend work is required.

La Poste strives to provide its readers with high quality and reliable news and information while constantly innovating. This mission is best served by a diverse, multigenerational workforce with diverse life experiences and perspectives. All cultures and all walks of life are welcome.

How to register

Interested persons should upload a cover letter, curriculum vitae and portfolio in PDF format to our job portal before August 9. All your application documents can be downloaded in the same field. Cover letter should be addressed to Creative Director Greg Manifold and Editors Tracy Grant and Krissah Thompson.

Visual editor of special sections

The Washington Post is looking for a Collaborative Visual Editor to work in our Newsroom to curate and commission articles and visuals on targeted topics, creating special sections and Post Journalism collections on a variety of topics and themes for a digital audience. This editor will work across the desks on stories for special sections, which can range from collections of post-pandemic life reset stories to a series of retirement-focused stories. This editor will work with freelancers to assign visuals to these stories and help launch newsroom projects alongside The Post’s strategic initiatives team while working directly with a story assignment editor at The Post. among the sales staff who will lead these efforts.

We are looking for a creative journalist with a variety of interests who can deliver cohesive coverage on a range of topics. This visual editor will be part of a cluster of project editors involved in our most ambitious projects. This position reports to our Creative Director and will work in tandem with the Special Sections Editor to plan and support these initiatives.

Ideal candidates would be looking for an opportunity to broaden their skills by working with different parts of the business, such as advertising and subscriptions. In this role, they will manage a budget and work with staff and freelancers. Expertise in photographic rights and permissions, a nuanced eye for photography and illustration, and the ability to work with freelance photojournalists and staff are required. Experience in designing digital presentations is also required.

This post is based in our Washington newsroom. Once we resume normal operations in September, it will no longer be eligible for remote work.

La Poste strives to provide its readers with high quality and reliable news and information while constantly innovating. This mission is best served by a diverse, multigenerational workforce with diverse life experiences and perspectives. All cultures and all walks of life are welcome.

How to register

Applicants must upload a curriculum vitae and cover letter to our job portal before August 6. All application documents can be downloaded in the same field. Your cover letter should be addressed to Creative Director Greg Manifold and Editors Tracy Grant, Krissah Thompson and Kat Downs Mulder.

News designer

The Washington Post’s design department has an opening for a designer to work on our award-winning team.

The main focus of this role will be to create editorial images and internal illustrations for the The Post’s Select application. We are looking for a well-rounded Visual Journalist who is proficient in conceptual thinking and typography. The best candidates will have experience working in Photoshop and experience with Adobe After Effects would be a plus. It is essential that this person be an enthusiastic team player about working in a highly collaborative environment. It helps to have the spirit of adventure, as we will be experimenting with new approaches on the development platforms. Experience in a fast-paced newsroom is desirable.

The position, which will require night and weekend work, is based in our Washington newsroom. Once we get back to normal operations, it will no longer be eligible for remote work.

La Poste strives to provide its readers with high quality and reliable news and information while constantly innovating. This mission is best served by a diverse, multigenerational workforce with diverse life experiences and perspectives. All cultures and all walks of life are welcome.

How to register

Interested persons should upload a curriculum vitae, a cover letter and a link to your portfolio on our job portal before August 6. All application documents can be downloaded in the same field. Cover letter should be addressed to Assistant Director of Design Amy Cavenaile, Creative Director Greg Manifold, and Editors Tracy Grant and Krissah Thompson.



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