Emerging Writers – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:24:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://stetmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Emerging Writers – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ 32 32 Tin Pan Alley 2 Concert Series to Celebrate Pride https://stetmagazine.com/tin-pan-alley-2-concert-series-to-celebrate-pride/ https://stetmagazine.com/tin-pan-alley-2-concert-series-to-celebrate-pride/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:25:13 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/tin-pan-alley-2-concert-series-to-celebrate-pride/ Tin Pan Alley 2, a free concert series showcasing new works of musical theater, will feature a panel of emerging writers on Friday, June 25, 2021 at 7:30 p.m. ET. The June 2021 edition will celebrate PRIDE with new musical theater works from Gianni Vincenzo Onori & Keurim Hur, Aaron Michael Fink and Jonathan keebler […]]]>


Tin Pan Alley 2, a free concert series showcasing new works of musical theater, will feature a panel of emerging writers on Friday, June 25, 2021 at 7:30 p.m. ET. The June 2021 edition will celebrate PRIDE with new musical theater works from Gianni Vincenzo Onori & Keurim Hur, Aaron Michael Fink and Jonathan keebler & Ryan korell, and hosted by Durra Leung and Sam rosenblatt. Streaming is free and will stay online at all times. For more information and to confirm your attendance, go to Tin Pan Alley 2 website.

The idea for the Tin Pan Alley 2 concert series comes from the legendary birthplace of many American standards at the turn of the 20th century. The mission of the concert series is to provide a platform for emerging musical theater writers and free entertainment for the audience. Each 45-minute concert has a specific theme and features three emerging musical theater writers (or teams of songwriters). They will each present three performance videos of prerecorded songs and have a chat with the hosts to share their creative process.

Guest artists include Ryan Andrews, Brooke DeRosa, Sean doherty, Maddie Fansler, Keri René Fuller, Jarrad Green, Michael Idalski, Devin Ilaw, Pearl sun, Jax Terry, Brynn williams, and Daniel youngelman.



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Ultimate Guide to the Capricorn Coast Writers Festival 2021 https://stetmagazine.com/ultimate-guide-to-the-capricorn-coast-writers-festival-2021/ https://stetmagazine.com/ultimate-guide-to-the-capricorn-coast-writers-festival-2021/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 02:04:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/ultimate-guide-to-the-capricorn-coast-writers-festival-2021/ The 2021 Capricorn Coast Writers Festival is set to sizzle June 11-13 with a host of exciting new events that will captivate readers and writers alike. In addition to a range of craft workshops for experienced and emerging writers, festival-goers will enjoy panel discussions and book signing sessions for readers who enjoy meeting and listening […]]]>


The 2021 Capricorn Coast Writers Festival is set to sizzle June 11-13 with a host of exciting new events that will captivate readers and writers alike.

In addition to a range of craft workshops for experienced and emerging writers, festival-goers will enjoy panel discussions and book signing sessions for readers who enjoy meeting and listening to authors talk about their books, their lives and their lives. their career.

Local authors can also participate in the Indie Book Marketplace which gives them visibility and a space to sell their books to festival-goers.

Acclaimed committee member and local author Amy Andrews said it was truly gratifying to be able to bring this event back face to face to the people of central Queensland.

“Much like major city festivals, this event caters to readers and writers alike and we look forward to welcoming everyone from near and far to participate in the wide range of festival activities,” said Ms. Andrews.

“It was important for the festival committee to include local writers on the program while bringing big names to our regional writers festival.

“Regions often lack exposure to popular, successful and well-known authors.

“Events like this are prevalent in capitals, so why should regional communities be left out of this experience?

The many volunteer hours of festival committee members in preparation for the event allowed the festival to engage people of all ages.

Ms Andrews said the student news contest, supported by Yeppoon Rotary, was another new and exciting initiative and was now in the judging phase with entries from all age groups.

“We had a particularly high turnout in the primary school category and the work we have read so far has been of an incredible standard,” she said.

“This year we also have the addition of Publisher Spotlights, including a QLD University Press Editor.

“The free workshops specially designed for children and youth and led by some of the best in the business will be popular with many. “

Matthew Condon and Hedley Thomas will speak at the event.

Investigative journalists and podcast kings Hedley Thomas (The Teacher’s Pet) and Matthew Condon will join the festival as speakers.

Award-winning author of non-fiction, historical fiction, commercial women’s fiction, children’s novels and poetry, Dr. Anita Heiss will bring an exciting twist to the growing festival.

Holly Ringland.

Holly Ringland.

Holly Ringland, whose debut novel Alice Heart’s Lost Flowers is being adapted for TV with Amazon Prime and with Sigourney Weaver, joins the talent roster.

Rachael Johns, prolific author and bestseller of female fiction, comes from Western Australia to share her experience at the festival.

Consult the program and book your tickets here.

Highlights of the Capricorn Coast Writers Festival

  • CCWF Opening Cocktail, Friday June 11: Rub shoulders with authors, editors and presenters sipping champagne and munching on canapes at the glamorous festival opening event.
  • In Conversation with Matthew Condon and Hedley Thomas: Join two investigative journalism giants, Hedley Thomas and Matthew Condon, as they kick off the festival on a high note at this entertaining and conversational event.
  • Matthew Condon OAM, investigative journalist, bestselling author, and no. 1 Podcast Creator with Ghost Gate Road, will interview Hedley Thomas, investigative journalist and podcaster, winner of multiple Walkley, The Teacher’s Pet and The Night Driver awards, during a one-hour straddling discussion of their experiences in journalism, podcasting and real crime.

  • Saturday Night Party with Holly Ringland, Dr Anita Heiss and Rachael Johns Compered by Paul Culliver: Join our three lead authors – Holly Ringland, Dr Anita Heiss and Rachael Johns as they each discuss a secret topic. Will be followed by a lively panel discussing books, writing, life, the universe and everything. The event is presented by Paul Culliver of ABC Radio Capricornia and promises to be an evening of fun, laughter and entertainment for all.
  • Six author discussion panels perfect for readers who enjoy listening to authors talk about the way they do the things they do – Crafting Stories for Children, What’s Love Got to Do With It, Inside The Mind Of An Author, Riveting Research, So What Does An Editor Do, The Rise of Independent Publishing.



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Arts Picks: Houston Children’s Museum reopens highlight this week https://stetmagazine.com/arts-picks-houston-childrens-museum-reopens-highlight-this-week/ https://stetmagazine.com/arts-picks-houston-childrens-museum-reopens-highlight-this-week/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 05:16:59 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/arts-picks-houston-childrens-museum-reopens-highlight-this-week/ Allora and Calzadilla’s “Graft” is set up in Menil’s east corridor and beyond. It contains thousands of yellow flowers in seven stages of decomposition, derived from the flowers of a species of oak native to the Caribbean. Photo: Paul Hester, Photographer / Menil Collection 1. Astor Piazzolla The Houston Symphony will perform its Summer Symphony […]]]>


Allora and Calzadilla’s “Graft” is set up in Menil’s east corridor and beyond. It contains thousands of yellow flowers in seven stages of decomposition, derived from the flowers of a species of oak native to the Caribbean.

Photo: Paul Hester, Photographer / Menil Collection

1. Astor Piazzolla

The Houston Symphony will perform its Summer Symphony Nights at the Miller! next week, with a magnificent and far-reaching program that includes Astor Piazzolla’s “Maria de Buenos Aires Suite”. Also on view: pieces by Richard Strauss, Sergei Prokofiev and Valerie Coleman’s blues-informed chamber work “Red Clay and Mississippi Delta”.

When: 8:30 p.m. June 10

Or: Miller Open Air Theater, 6000 Hermann Park Drive

Details: free; reserved seats available at the Miller box office; milleroutdoortheatre.com

André Dansby

2. Brie Ruais

Brooklyn-based artist Brie Ruais brings her new large-scale ceramic pieces to Houston for “Movement at the Edge of the Land,” the artist’s first institutional solo exhibition. Ruais creates each piece from its body weight in clay, but the range of expression is abstract, physical and captivating. Some pieces almost look like leftovers found after a fire, with the cuts and gouchings and twisted shapes providing twisted beauty rather than smooth outlines. Ruais created the pieces specifically for the exhibition space, which is entering the Moody Gallery at Rice University this week.

When:
10 am-5pm June 5 – August 28 (Tuesday-Saturday)

Or: Moody Center for the Arts, Rice University, 6100 Main

Details: free; moody.rice.edu

André Dansby

3. Community day “The specters of midday”

There are three reasons to include the Menil Collection “Noon Specters” Community Day in your weekend calendar. On Saturday, Da Camera presents a Caribbean-inspired jazz concerto by Will Cruz and Quattro; Writers in schools will organize a personalized poem pit stop by an emerging writer; and students in the University of Houston’s Creative Writing Program will read a selection of poems by poet Aimé Césaire. The trio of happenings celebrates the unmissable exhibition of Allora & Calzadilla; picnic blankets are encouraged, as is trips to on-site food trucks.

When:
3 p.m. – 5 p.m. June 5

Or: Menil Collection Main Lawn, 1533 Sul Ross

Details: free; menil.org

Amber Elliott

4. “Invisible sites”

The Children’s Museum of Houston reopens on June 8 with a new exhibit, “Sights Unseen”. The highly Instagrammable phosphorescent experiment explores the anatomy and physiology of the eye, what makes up visible light and how animals see compared to humans.

When: June 8

When:
June 8

Or: Houston Children’s Museum, 1500 Binz

Details: Tickets start at $ 12 for non-members; cmhouston.org

Amber Elliott





  • André Dansby

    Andrew Dansby covers culture and entertainment, both local and national, for the Houston Chronicle. He arrived at The Chronicle in 2004 from Rolling Stone, where he spent five years writing about music. Previously, he had spent five years in book publishing, working with publisher George RR Martin on the first two books in the series that would become “Game of Thrones” on television. images you have never seen. He has written for Rolling Stone, American Songwriter, Texas Music, Playboy, and other publications.

    Andrew doesn’t like monkeys, dolphins and the outdoors.


  • Amber Elliott

    Amber Elliott covers the arts and society for the Houston Chronicle.



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Phillips’ Mill 3rd Annual Emerging Playwright Competition Online reading scheduled for June 12 https://stetmagazine.com/phillips-mill-3rd-annual-emerging-playwright-competition-online-reading-scheduled-for-june-12/ https://stetmagazine.com/phillips-mill-3rd-annual-emerging-playwright-competition-online-reading-scheduled-for-june-12/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 02:53:14 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/phillips-mill-3rd-annual-emerging-playwright-competition-online-reading-scheduled-for-june-12/ What happens when a drunk sports journalist wakes up alone, and a little beaten up, in a dive bar in the 1970s? He recounts some of the most messy details of his life, engaging in a hectic but charming, witty and dizzy dialogue with himself. This is the premise of a short piece by JB […]]]>


What happens when a drunk sports journalist wakes up alone, and a little beaten up, in a dive bar in the 1970s? He recounts some of the most messy details of his life, engaging in a hectic but charming, witty and dizzy dialogue with himself. This is the premise of a short piece by JB Heaps called “Go Gently Into the Night,” one of six to be presented online by the Phillips’ Mill Community Association on June 12 at 7 p.m. ET.

For the third year, Phillips’ Mill will honor the work of regional playwrights by presenting six short pieces selected as part of its Emerging Playwright Competition with jury. “After much deliberation on the lingering pandemic restrictions on live performances, the decision was made to present this year’s winning works as a virtual reading and discussion with the playwrights and a moderator,” says Valerie Eastburn, President of the theater committee at Phillips’ Mill. . “We look forward to being back at Le Moulin this summer when our summer youth drama program continues in the form of a workshop and in-person performance. “

For more than 100 years, plays have been performed at the Phillips’ Mill, an 18th-century former flourmill located on a winding section of River Road just north of New Hope, Pennsylvania. It is a perfect setting for community theater, both intimate and welcoming. .

“Community theater not only enriches the lives and potentially stimulates the careers of those who participate in it, but it makes the arts accessible to people who otherwise might never have seen a live performance or musical.” , notes Eastburn.

Phillips’ Mill Drama presents a variety of quality entertainment including cabarets, short plays and poetry readings, but also supports the aspirations of writers, actors, musicians and other emerging artists.

JB Heaps may be “emerging” as a playwright, but he has had an impressive career that has notably won five Emmy Awards as executive producer of Showtime Sports. His “debut” in entertainment came early on, as an actor in a small role in the 1963 film adaptation of the novel “The Lord of the Flies”.

“I quickly realized that playing wasn’t for me,” he jokes. He has always been more interested in developing characters through writing than in bringing them to life on stage or on the screen. “Once a play is on stage, the job is up to the actor. I pretend I’m not nervous (when I see my work performed), but of course I’m totally invested. I can’t wait to see all plays performed on June 12. “

Each of the winning playwrights lives within a 100 mile radius of Phillips’ Mill. This year’s winners include Nick DeSimone, New York, NY, for “Close Your Eyes”; Adam Richter, of West Reading, Pa., For “Eye Contact”; Jeff Stolzer, New York, NY, for “The New Abnormal”; JB Heaps, New York, NY, for “Go Gently Into the Night”; Jim Moss, Branchburg, NJ, for “Far From Providence”; and Kimberly Kalaja, New York, NY, for “Acts Without Words”.

For more information visit phillipsmill.org/drama/phillips-mill-drama or register here to see the readings live on June 12 at 7 p.m.



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Amazon Literary Partnership announces that NGOs receive support in 2021 https://stetmagazine.com/amazon-literary-partnership-announces-that-ngos-receive-support-in-2021/ https://stetmagazine.com/amazon-literary-partnership-announces-that-ngos-receive-support-in-2021/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 11:03:08 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/amazon-literary-partnership-announces-that-ngos-receive-support-in-2021/ Amazon UK announced this year’s recipients as part of the Amazon Literary Partnership. Now in its second year in the UK, the Amazon Literary Partnership has awarded 23 nonprofit literary organizations whose mission is to champion emerging writers and diversity in storytelling. To coincide with this, Amazon UK surveyed the country to find the top […]]]>


Amazon UK announced this year’s recipients as part of the Amazon Literary Partnership. Now in its second year in the UK, the Amazon Literary Partnership has awarded 23 nonprofit literary organizations whose mission is to champion emerging writers and diversity in storytelling.

To coincide with this, Amazon UK surveyed the country to find the top 25 books covering modern and classic literary titles that we would have loved to have written on our own, featuring JK Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone at the top of the list. In second place, the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Kill a mockingbird by Harper Lee, the remaining top five including Stephen King’s horror novel, HE, Dan Brown’s mysterious thriller, The “Da Vinci Code and Helen Fielding’s comedy of well-being, Bridget Jones Diary closing of the first five.

The dystopian classic The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, Of mice and Men, the masterful representation of the failing American dream, by the romantic novel of manners of John Steinbeck and Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice is also in the top 25 list.

The study of 1,500 Britons also found that more than a quarter of the country (27%) believe they have a bestselling book inside waiting to be written – although 54% admit they wouldn’t know everything. just not where to start. A quarter (25 percent) insisted they didn’t have enough free time to sit down and write a novel, while more than a fifth (22 percent) didn’t think their spelling and their grammar was good enough to become full time writers.

In fact, 60% agree that they thought their writing skills had deteriorated since leaving school, instant messaging (50%), use of spellchecks (42%) and increased usage social media (38%) affecting all writing skills. Despite this, more than a third (37%) now believe that technology has made writing a story easier and more accessible than ever.

From Amazon’s beginnings as a business, the company has always strived to help writers not only tell their stories, but also find their readers. Through programs such as the Amazon Literary Partnership, Amazon provides grants to a range of literary organizations across the UK that empower writers of all ages and skill levels, helping them create, publish, learn , teach, experiment and prosper. This year’s grant recipients include six organizations supported by the Amazon Literary Partnership in 2020 and a wide range of new groups such as the National Center for Writing, Africa, Writes, Papatango Theater Company and the Scottish Book Trust, among many. other.

Darren Hardy, UK Author and Editorial Programs Manager, Amazon.co.uk, said:

“While as a nation we could have taken the opportunity to imagine the magical world of Hogwarts or secret codes and conspiracies, we know from our collaboration with incredible literary organizations supported by the Amazon Literary Partnership, that there is still so much untapped writing talent waiting. to discover in the United Kingdom. By funding groups that advocate for the voices of underrepresented writers, we hope to encourage people to write (and read) about a wider variety of perspectives on the world we live in today. With the Amazon Literary Partnership in its second year in the UK, we’re excited to support more nonprofits than ever before. “

Writing isn’t exclusively reserved for those starting a novel, and many Britons find themselves getting creative with words in another way, with 37% frequently making up social media posts, nearly a quarter (24%) write a daily journal and 24% like to write. letters to their friends and family. Almost half (44%) of those surveyed said they had devoted more time to this type of writing in the past 12 months due to more time spent at home.

The study also found that, so important is literature to the nation, a quarter (22%) say they have read at least one life-changing novel, and in terms of the novels we love to read, half (50 %) say they feel there are more diverse characters in today’s novels, while 43 percent think more diverse writers stand out when it comes to bestselling literature .

Further details on all of the organizations supported under this year’s Amazon Literary Partnership grant can be found on the Amazon Day One blog here.

Books the British wish they had written:

  1. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by JK Rowling 34%
  2. Kill a mockingbird by Harper Lee 20%
  3. HE by Stephen King 19%
  4. The “Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown 18%
  5. Bridget Jones Diary by Helen Fielding 16%
  6. Fifty shades of Grey by EL James 15%
  7. Of mice and Men by John Steinbeck 14%
  8. The girl with the dragon tattoo by Sieg Larsson 13%
  9. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen 12%
  10. The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood 11%
  11. Jack Reacher Series by Lee Enfant 11%
  12. the wolf of Wall Street by Jordan Belfort ten%
  13. Tinker Tailor Spy Soldier by John le Carré 9%
  14. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger 9%
  15. Gatsby the magnificent by F Scott Fitzgerald 9%
  16. Dorian Gray’s photo by Oscar Wilde 8%
  17. The catcher in the rye by JD Salinger 8%
  18. About a boy by Nick Hornby 8%
  19. Gender and city by Candace Bushnell 7%
  20. The alchemist by Paulo Coelho 7%
  21. American psychopath by Bret Eastern Ellis 7%
  22. Bravo Two Zero by Andy McNab 6%
  23. Play it like Beckham by Narinder Dhami 6%
  24. Do androids dream of electric sheep by Philip K Dick 6%
  25. How to win friends and influence people by Dale Carnegie 6%



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Committed to organizing a Westchester theater brand https://stetmagazine.com/committed-to-organizing-a-westchester-theater-brand/ https://stetmagazine.com/committed-to-organizing-a-westchester-theater-brand/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 16:18:54 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/committed-to-organizing-a-westchester-theater-brand/ (Left to right) Missy Flower performs in Westchester Collaborative Theater’s New Hudson Valley Voices; Nathan Flower and Alan Lutwin, Executive Director of the WCT, are co-producers of the festival. Credit: Greg Perry. Nathan Flower of Ossining, co-producer of the first Hudson Valley New Voices Festival at the Westchester Collaborative Theater “We are not competing with […]]]>


(Left to right) Missy Flower performs in Westchester Collaborative Theater’s New Hudson Valley Voices; Nathan Flower and Alan Lutwin, Executive Director of the WCT, are co-producers of the festival. Credit: Greg Perry.

Nathan Flower of Ossining, co-producer of the first Hudson Valley New Voices Festival at the Westchester Collaborative Theater

“We are not competing with New York, we are growing our own artistic brand in Westchester where there is so much fertile material,” said Nathan’s Flower (Nate), co-producer of Westchester Collaborative Theater The inaugural three-part festival of (WCT) Hudson Valley New Voices (HVNV), streaming on alternate weekends from May 20 to June 20. Alan lutwin, executive director of the Ossining-based theater company, is a co-producer.

Flower, associate chair of the theater department at NYU Tisch and a resident of Ossining for a dozen years, continued, “While New York is a world theater center, Westchester and the Hudson Valley region can centralize and mobilize to create a world-class theater. “

Strong words from a theater professional who has lived much of his life in Astoria and has been integrated into the city theater for more than 30 years, first as an actor and, more recently, mainly in as an instructor, director and choreographer of physical performance.

“I used to think of myself as a City-based theater maker, but this field is ripe for growth and change and capable of producing thoughtful and relevant work. County theater companies have an opportunity, even a obligation to continue to improve the quality of theatrical creation in Westchester, ”said Flower, artistic director of the Hudson Valley Moving Company (HVMC), a troupe of expressive movement actors that perform throughout the county.

During a 2017 lunch with Lutwin, a meeting organized by Henry welt, CEO of Ossining Innovates !, Lutwin highlighted the WCT’s commitment to diversity. Flower, who has long advocated that the theater should truly reflect society, applauded, stressing that inclusiveness should be multigenerational.

Flower had become a veteran director / curator of the WCT when he agreed to co-produce the festival and direct Gen Z Outloud at the end of 2020 in 40 submissions and 14 selections.

“The reading committee couldn’t believe the age of writers!” Flower said. In a talk-back, playwright Kat Bellew said, “I write a lot of things that are disturbing. I’m not good at happy endings. I want to leave the audience with an emotional resonance. “

Flower has her own talented Gen Z contingent at home – Son Lowden, 18, is the broadcast technician for HVNV; the girl Addison, 16, played as a percussionist with HVMC; son Junot, 13, is a cellist and jazz drummer. Wife Missy Fleur played with WCT, including HVNV.

Vintage Voices, dramatic stories told by seniors, came to life thanks to the WCT actor Christine Fonsale which launched an initiative based on a Life Stories program. She interacted with residents of Ossining Atria via Zoom, assisted by Lorraine Festa, director of Atria Engage Life.

Fonsale said, “The beauty of the program is that it gives residents the opportunity to form a community. They are amazing people and their lives are incredibly rich. She also created a mini-group through Bonnie Coe, member of the Ossining Arts Council.

Misha sinclair

Voices of Color, played by people of color, is dedicated to the memory of WCT writer / director / actor Joe Albert Lima, who died in 2020. Emerging playwright and long-time WCT member Misha Templar Sinclair took over as director and producer with co-producer Melissa Nocera.

According to Sinclair, who researched scripts from community groups and places of worship, “The plays are a compilation of lives, values ​​and experiences ranging from Jim Crow to life as a person of color in the world. Contemporary America. They are a bold and moving reminder of how far we have come and how far we can go. These are revelations from the heart. “

Will the Hudson Valley New Voices Festival become an annual event?

“Absolutely!” Flower said. “We’ll be back in person, just as tough and diverse, and thankful that the first one exceeded our expectations.”

Voices of Color airs Friday, June 18 and Saturday, June 19 at 8 p.m. and Sunday, June 20 at 3 p.m. Visit: https://wctvoicesofcolor.eventbrite.com or call (914) 263-4953.

Evelyn Mertens is a playwright and marketing consultant based in North Westchester.



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JOHN BRUMMETT: Fickle arrows fly https://stetmagazine.com/john-brummett-fickle-arrows-fly/ https://stetmagazine.com/john-brummett-fickle-arrows-fly/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 06:45:11 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/john-brummett-fickle-arrows-fly/ A reader sends a message that he has not seen the arrows of conventional wisdom in some time. It could have been an observation, a complaint, a request or a celebration. Take this as a request and oblige. Thus we will be in an irregular tradition in this space of shooting of arrows during the […]]]>


A reader sends a message that he has not seen the arrows of conventional wisdom in some time. It could have been an observation, a complaint, a request or a celebration.

Take this as a request and oblige.

Thus we will be in an irregular tradition in this space of shooting of arrows during the long weekends of holidays – Memorial and Labor – which require the writing of the chronicle of Tuesday before the weekend.

You write five in a week and you are allowed to lean on the crutch of an arrow from time to time. It’s my story, anyway.

Recall that the arrow function began decades ago, in part as a travesty of fleeting conventional wisdom, known to shift between composition and publication. The concept was stolen – adapted, I mean – from a Newsweek magazine article.

Also be aware that a few years ago I stopped using the cross arrow on the assumption that punting should not be allowed, that an arrow must go up or down and that shooting in a neutral way is is to draw none.

The arrows do not reflect my preference, as you will soon see, but my reluctant assessment. It hurts to draw some, if not most of it. So let’s get it over with.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson – A Republican governor of Arkansas who’s currently gone mad, dispelling many members of his ruling far-right party in The New York Times and appearing on “The View” is one who moves quickly.

Donald Trump – Arkansas is his domain, fully at the service of his ego and the next attempted election-stealing insurgency. Joe Biden acknowledges that we must now examine reports that covid was truly a ‘Chinese virus’, meaning an accidentally leaked and concealed laboratory creation in Wuhan, gives Trump the tragic opportunity to tell us he has it to us said.

Tom Cotton – He can also tell he told us. He positions himself well for post-Trump American conservatism, in which he emerges as a leading thinker and champion. He is also a pioneer in a new American policy in which having a good personality no longer matters. Only angry resentment matters, and that’s Tom’s forte.

He is also an unusual young man of influence, spawning copycat atrocities such as Sen. Trent Garner of El Dorado, and using his PAC to fortify himself and have fun with colleagues such as the GOP congressman in the second district, French Hill.

French Hill – See the immediately preceding item. To his credit, he voted for the bipartisan commission to investigate Trump’s January 6 insurgency. But to gain credit in this space and about it, is essentially to argue for a downward arrow of the fickle fate of conventional wisdom.

Joe Biden – He’s doing pretty well, although there was a time when an American president would have been the first politician to appear in these arrow columns. I almost forgot to put it in.

But boring oblivion is pretty much what the country needs right now.

Kamala Harris – What happened to her? Has she taken firm control of the border crisis and I missed it?

Frank Scott – This one hurts as much as the upward arrows for Trump and Cotton. He has emerged as, and may still be, what Little Rock needs, a galvanizing generational force. But his belated attempt to redefine the mayor’s role as the true political chief executive – submitting plans to city board members rather than trying to build preemptive consensus – has been more awkward than it did not have to, serving mainly to polarize.

The other night, a council member asked her if everything was okay if she offered any suggestions on how the state could spend millions of federal dollars on pandemic relief, rather than just waiting for it to happen. ‘he tells her what he wanted her to do, as the comments had indicated.

The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville – In today’s climate, a leading higher education institution faces two imperatives. The first is to collect a ton of private money from the rich. The other is to adapt to modern racial thinking that the sins and neglect of the past can no longer be excused. The statute of J. William Fulbright and the question of the naming of the colleges place the AU in a totally untenable situation.

The rich’s need for private money – some of whom would object to insulting Fulbright’s largely noble legacy – will prevail, it must be assumed, and Fulbright will remain in good stead. But there could be a cost to reputation and vital future diversity.

Jim Hendren – Discussions about an independent gubernatorial candidacy have disappeared. Its new, well-intentioned and well-staffed Common Ground Arkansas must represent more than a state version of the equally well-meaning and well-staffed national No Labels movement. No Labels is not yet in a position to create a central leverage force changing the hostile binary dynamic that makes national politics silly and dysfunctional.

We are waiting for signs of life and relevance from Common Ground, not to mention effectiveness.

I – I just shot nine arrows and eight of them – all but Biden’s almost forgotten ascending arrow – pierced my heart.


John Brummett, whose column appears regularly in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, is a member of the Arkansas Writers Hall of Fame. Email him at jbrummett@arkansasonline.com. Read his Twitter feed @johnbrummett.



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So you want to democratize venture capital – TechCrunch https://stetmagazine.com/so-you-want-to-democratize-venture-capital-techcrunch/ https://stetmagazine.com/so-you-want-to-democratize-venture-capital-techcrunch/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 18:01:14 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/so-you-want-to-democratize-venture-capital-techcrunch/ A venture capitalist once told me frankly that whenever you see the phrase “democratization” in technology marketing material, take it as a wake-up call. Democracy, in general, often comes with an ironic caveat: it disproportionately benefits white and male participants. Now you know me well enough to know that I wouldn’t start your Saturday with […]]]>


A venture capitalist once told me frankly that whenever you see the phrase “democratization” in technology marketing material, take it as a wake-up call. Democracy, in general, often comes with an ironic caveat: it disproportionately benefits white and male participants. Now you know me well enough to know that I wouldn’t start your Saturday with that dreary introduction normally, but I think this reality is why a new tool, championed by tech entrepreneurs Lolita and Josh Taub, could be activated. . to something really innovative.

The Taubs launched a GP-LP, or general partner and sponsor, matching tool to help under-represented fund managers access the capital they need to start their fund. The matchmaker connects those looking to raise funds (GP!) With check writers (LP!). The move follows their founder-investor matching tool, which to date has generated more than 1,000 IPOs which they say have resulted in 27 checks totaling nearly $ 4 million in total principal.

Yes, matching LPs to GPs is a relatively straightforward concept and technology. And it’s a relatively straightforward experience. But that couldn’t have happened five years ago, and certainly ten years ago. Zoom Investing has changed the way people meet and check out, and I think the GP-LP tool is a key data point on how emerging fund managers can bring option to their fundraising process. .

Speaking of fundraising:

The tool’s explicit focus on helping only under-represented people – which it defines as anyone who does not fit the classic Silicon Valley mold, such as women, LGBTQ + people, non-graduates. Ivy (or people from non-elite employers) and non-wealthy people – is a layer of differentiation from many other tools. Products like the AngelList Rolling Fund are great, but ongoing public fundraising still largely benefits those with networks to tap into in the first place – just take a quick scroll to see who has one so far.

Let me put it like this: We have come to a point where there are a lot of tools out there that help founders and investors leverage their community to get checks. What is lacking, however, are the tools that help people without community, network and underestimated access to these opportunities. Although LPs are still hesitant as emerging managers raise their second and third funds, this effort is a good step in the right direction. And I will follow it to see how it works.

It’s been a great week for Black and other underrepresented founders:

Then the rest of this newsletter will focus on disaster technology, Airbnb, and an S-1 health communications record. You can always find me on Twitter @nmasc_.

Disaster technology is at an inflection point

Image credits: Hiroshi watanabe (Opens in a new window) / Getty Images

Disaster technology, like startups that use data to fight wildfires or analyze brainwaves to analyze PTSD after a traumatic event, is passing a moment. Are you surprised? COVID-19 and the ongoing climate crisis have prompted entrepreneurs to create proactive solutions that tackle literal disaster. Our own Danny Crichton has spent 12,000 words mapping the landscape so you don’t have to.

Here’s what you need to know: The Equity team summed up those 12,000 words about disaster into a 20-minute episode focused on key takeaways and highlights. As Danny explains on the show, “Cataclysms are a growing industry.”

If you are more of a reader than a listener …

Next Airbnb trip

airbnb kicked out

Image credits: Getty Images

Since travel was first closed last March, all eyes have been on Airbnb, the globally recognized short-term travel and rental company. Almost a year ago, the company reported declining revenues and the loss of 1,900 jobs, or about 25% of its workforce. Now, as nomadic digital lifestyles and long-term travel return, it also has a growth story worth sharing.

Here’s what you need to know: Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky spoke with our own Jordan Crook to talk about how his company is preparing for a faster and more agile post-pandemic reality. Time will tell if Airbnb’s stance comes to fruition, but getting into the mind of one of the co-founders of a company crushed and then resurrected by this pandemic can give founders tactical advice on how to frame the conflict and the sequel.

Brian Chesky: I had no idea that a travel agency during a pandemic could be even crazier than starting a business based on strangers living together. I kind of feel like I’m now 39 out of 49. It was definitely the craziest year ever.

Our business initially fell 80% in eight weeks. I say it’s like driving a car. You can’t go 130 km / h, hit the brakes and expect nothing really bad to happen. Now imagine you’re going 80 km / h, hit the brakes, then rebuild the car while moving, and then try to speed up to go public, all on Zoom.

When the future of life merges with the future of work:

Around TC

If you haven’t heard it, TC Sessions: Mobility 2021 will take place on June 9. The one-day virtual event is filled with the best and brightest minds working or investing in the future of transportation. The file is filled with founders, investors and experts in micromobility, autonomous vehicles, electrification and air taxis.

Among the growing list of speakers is the Motional Chairman Karl Iagnemma and co-founder and CEO of Aurora Chris Urmson, which will join forces to talk about the technical problems that remain to be solved, the war for talents and the best economic models and applications of autonomous vehicles. Other guests include Zoox co-founder and CTO Jesse Levinson, community organizer, transport consultant and lawyer Tamika L. Butler, Co-founder and CEO of Remix Tiffany Chu and co-founder and CEO of Revel Frank reig. There is also the founder and CEO of Joby Aviation JoeBen Bevirt, investor and founder of LinkedIn Reid hoffman (whose special purpose acquisition company just merged with Joby) will talk about the future of flight – and PSPCs.

And to answer your next question, yes, you can still buy your tickets here.

Through the week

Seen on TechCrunch

Seen on Extra Crunch

Okay, bet,

NOT





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Michelle Good’s Book Explains Why Indigenous Peoples Can’t ‘Get Over’ Residential School Trauma – Coast Mountain News https://stetmagazine.com/michelle-goods-book-explains-why-indigenous-peoples-cant-get-over-residential-school-trauma-coast-mountain-news/ https://stetmagazine.com/michelle-goods-book-explains-why-indigenous-peoples-cant-get-over-residential-school-trauma-coast-mountain-news/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 17:16:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/michelle-goods-book-explains-why-indigenous-peoples-cant-get-over-residential-school-trauma-coast-mountain-news/ Michelle Good says her book “Five Little Indians” is her answer to a frustrating question that often comes up in discussions about Indigenous peoples and residential schools in Canada: “Why can’t they get over it?” As a lawyer, attorney and daughter of a residential school survivor, Ms. Good says the devastating long-term effects of the […]]]>


Michelle Good says her book “Five Little Indians” is her answer to a frustrating question that often comes up in discussions about Indigenous peoples and residential schools in Canada: “Why can’t they get over it?”

As a lawyer, attorney and daughter of a residential school survivor, Ms. Good says the devastating long-term effects of the government system are an integral part of her life.

Good, a member of the Red Pheasant Cree Nation west of Saskatoon, says she drew on those experiences to create her acclaimed debut novel, “Five Little Indians,” with a braided narrative that distracts attention from the historic infliction of prejudice to the way Indigenous peoples carry this trauma with them to the present day.

“The question, why can’t they get over it?” The answer is not in horror of abuse, ”said Good, 64, of Savona, west of Kamloops, British Columbia. . “

“Five Little Indians,” by HarperCollins Publishers, chronicles the cross-journeys of a group of residential school survivors from east Vancouver as they strive to rebuild their lives and familiarize themselves with their past.

The book won Amazon Canada’s First Novel Award on Thursday and is up for a Governor General’s Award next Tuesday, earning him the rare honor of being a promising 60-year-old author.

Now a referee, Good says she started working on the novel about a decade ago, juggling her practice of law and studying at the Creative Writing program at the University of British Columbia.

Although she was able to write later in life, Good says fiction has given her the freedom to explore truths that transcend the rigors of proof in the legal process.

“A thing doesn’t have to be factual to be true,” says Good, who once ran a small law firm and represented residential school survivors.

“One of the reasons people respond to this book is that it’s true, if not factual, on a very, very visceral level.”

As part of her writing process, Good says she has studied hundreds of psychological assessments of survivors of childhood physical and sexual abuse to better understand how these injuries can shape a person’s trajectory.

She says this research has explained how the central characters of “Five Little Indians” deal with the life-changing aftershocks of being torn from their families and communities and forced into a system designed to “take the Indian out of the child.” “.

“The point of the book is to find out how difficult it is to live with these impacts of coming out of these schools that are just overwhelmed with psychological wounds and faced with lack of support, lack of resources (and) racism,” says Good.

“This is something that has gone straight to the fabric of the Aboriginal community and has done great damage.

Since its release in 2020, “Five Little Indians” has been touring the literary awards circuit, securing places on Giller’s Long List and Writers’ Trust Shortlist last fall.

Good also pulled off the unusual feat of winning three major awards in a single day at the start of May.

“Five Little Indians” took home the $ 60,000 First Novel Award this week, is shortlisted for the Rakuten Kobo Emerging Writer Award next month, and is among the heavyweight finalists for the Governor General’s Literary Awards, which will be announced on Tuesday.

Others vying for the $ 25,000 prize in the Governor General’s fiction category: Thomas King, of Guelph, Ont., For “Indians on Vacation”, of HarperCollins Canada; Francesca Ekwuyasi of Halifax with “Butter Honey Pig Bread”, from Arsenal Pulp Press; Leanne Betasamosake Simpson for “Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies,” from House of Anansi Press; and Lisa Robertson, born in Toronto, for “The Baudelaire Fractal” by Coach House Books.

Good says the rewards have been “extremely satisfying”. But most significant of all is the reception the book received from residential school survivors and their families who recognize their own stories in the characters Good created, she says.

“This is my love letter to survivors,” Good says. “I feel like it’s something I can be proud of until one day I move on.”

boarding schools



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Glyndwr graduate set to forge successful career as playwright and director https://stetmagazine.com/glyndwr-graduate-set-to-forge-successful-career-as-playwright-and-director/ https://stetmagazine.com/glyndwr-graduate-set-to-forge-successful-career-as-playwright-and-director/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 15:15:43 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/glyndwr-graduate-set-to-forge-successful-career-as-playwright-and-director/ A TALENTÉ young playwright and director shared how his studies at Wrexham Glyndwr University helped build a career in the industry. Kallum Weyman – who graduated from WGU with a BA (Hons) Theater, Television and Performance – was recently awarded a grant to the Genedlaethol Cymru Theater to develop a new play. Kallum, 22, who […]]]>


A TALENTÉ young playwright and director shared how his studies at Wrexham Glyndwr University helped build a career in the industry.

Kallum Weyman – who graduated from WGU with a BA (Hons) Theater, Television and Performance – was recently awarded a grant to the Genedlaethol Cymru Theater to develop a new play.

Kallum, 22, who grew up in Deganwy, explained how studying to Glyndwr had helped them identify and progress in their goals, especially directing and writing dramas.

They said, “It’s a dynamic course that’s really important as I walked to the next step.

“I found my work at Wrexham to be really, really wide and varied. I gained a solid foundation in the history of theater and experienced different forms of theater over the three years.

The former Ysgol y Creuddyn student in Penrhyn Bay, with autism and dyspraxia, added how the university has supported them both practically and emotionally in their studies, where applicable.

They added, “I remember I had a rough time in third grade, but every time I would go and chat with the lecturers and we were there for over an hour just to talk about lessons, theater and other things.

“I really felt from that one-two-one support, not just for my needs, that they really knew me and were there to help me – and I know a lot of other people feel the same way.”

Kallum had to make two throws to get the Theatr Genedlaethol Cymru scholarship and spoke of his pride in succeeding.

They said, “It was really amazing to get to the second round of pitches because that was just my words, so someone read that and thought there was value there.

“By doing the project and talking to different people about the idea, it really gave me confidence in my work.”

Kallum received funding to develop the first 20 pages of a drama, as well as an outline of the story.

Despite the restrictions created by the Covid 19 crisis, Kallum was able to establish contacts in Wales and beyond.

Kallum, who identifies as non-binary, has also worked in online sessions with the Write Your Truth project, organized by the Theater Queers company.

Kallum also received praise for their production of Educating Rita, which was part of their Masters in Directing course at Trinity St David’s University in Cardiff.

They also participated in an Emerging Writers Project with Cardiff’s Other Room Theater, which resulted in the play Train Track Issues, which takes an alternative look at political and ethical dilemmas.

Kallum has received positive feedback for the piece.

“It was nice to have the feeling that my work is good, that people love it and want to support me to create more work,” they said.

“It has been a great feeling during what has been a pretty horrible time, because of the pandemic.”

Elen Mai Nefydd, Program Manager for Drama, Television and Performance, added: “We are extremely proud of Kallum’s accomplishments since graduating from Glyndŵr and the way they have used their skills with us. to pursue a specialist course in theater training, they achieved so much in such a short time and they were determined to continue working through the pandemic. We wish them the best in their future endeavors. ”

To learn more about the Study (BA) of Theater, Television and Performance, visit: https://www.glyndwr.ac.uk/en/Undergraduatecourses/PerformingArts/



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