Books – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:16:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://stetmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Books – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ 32 32 Williamsburg Library offers an inclusive book club for young people and adults https://stetmagazine.com/williamsburg-library-offers-an-inclusive-book-club-for-young-people-and-adults/ https://stetmagazine.com/williamsburg-library-offers-an-inclusive-book-club-for-young-people-and-adults/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 17:55:21 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/williamsburg-library-offers-an-inclusive-book-club-for-young-people-and-adults/ The Williamsburg Regional Library offers a reading group for teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (WY Daily file) WILLIAMSBURG – The Williamsburg Regional Library (WRL) continually strives to reach out to all members of the community, one book at a time. WRL Next Chapter Book Group is a unique community-based program for adolescents […]]]>


The Williamsburg Library.  (Daily WYPhoto)
The Williamsburg Regional Library offers a reading group for teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. (WY Daily file)

WILLIAMSBURG – The Williamsburg Regional Library (WRL) continually strives to reach out to all members of the community, one book at a time.

WRL Next Chapter Book Group is a unique community-based program for adolescents and adults with Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy and other intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The group meets in person once a month at WRL Stryker Center, 412 N Boundary St, where they read together and then discuss the stories and the different characters in the books.

Youth Services Librarian, Linda Niedzwick, has been leading the group since fall 2019.

While the program virtually took place during the pandemic, WRL resumed holding it in person as restrictions were lifted.

Niedzwick said reading skills are not necessary and the program has included participants who are considered non-verbal.

The group is currently made up of six teens and adults with disabilities, and Niedzwick said she hopes to add more.

“Right now we’re reading ‘Disney’s Adventure Stories’ and our next book will be ‘Desmond Cole Ghost Patrol, The Haunted House Next Door’,” she said.

Each participant keeps their copy of the books free of charge.

“We take turns reading the books, so they don’t have to read the books ahead of time,” Niefzwick said. “We encourage social interactions and friendships at our meetings. ”

Next chapter is an international organization that started in 2002 with the mission of providing members of the intellectual disability community with a safe environment to read, learn and make new friends.

From North America to Europe, groups meet at their local public libraries, bookstores or cafes every week or month to read aloud and discuss the books with a facilitator.

According to its website, Next Chapter is the world’s largest community book club program. Anyone can participate, regardless of their reading level or ability.

Besides public libraries, other organizations such as Social service agencies and parent groups have also joined in bringing the program to the communities.

Next Chapter strives to help improve reading skills and socializing. However, unlike a traditional reading course, it focuses on reading to learn rather than learning to read.

This month’s next chapter group of books will meet on Saturday, June 5 at 1 p.m. at the Stryker Center.

For more information, contact Linda Niedzwick at Lniedzwick@wrl.org.

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Pride book sale underway through Orange County Library System https://stetmagazine.com/pride-book-sale-underway-through-orange-county-library-system/ https://stetmagazine.com/pride-book-sale-underway-through-orange-county-library-system/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 22:57:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/pride-book-sale-underway-through-orange-county-library-system/ The Friends of the Orange County Library System is located on the third floor of the Orange County Library System Main Library in downtown Orlando. The store has something for all ages, including books, movies, and music. “All items that enter the store are donated by the public or library books that have been taken […]]]>


The Friends of the Orange County Library System is located on the third floor of the Orange County Library System Main Library in downtown Orlando. The store has something for all ages, including books, movies, and music.

“All items that enter the store are donated by the public or library books that have been taken out of circulation,” said Brett Van Wagner, retail sales coordinator and volunteers.

The bookstore is run by volunteers from the Friends of the Orange County Library System.

[TRENDING: Video: Shootout between children, deputies | Fla. man survives alligator bite to head | Fla. woman found underground — again]

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“Our average price is $ 1.50 and we have a $ 1 section. We have a lot of used DVDs and CDs that cost as little as 50 cents, ”Van Wagner said.

Proceeds from the bookstore go to the Friends of the Orange County Library System and they help fund things like scholarships and programs for OCLS staff.

Celebrating Pride Month, the bookstore is hosting a Pride Book Sale, in partnership with The Center, an organization that provides resources to the LGBTQ + community.

“We provide free mental health counseling, we oversee the Orlando United Assistance Center which helps Pulse survivors, we have programs for seniors and programs for youth, addiction and recovery and more,” said Executive Director George Wallace.

Wallace said the Center had downsized its library by donating dozens of books to the bookstore. Including background materials and books with characters representing members of the LGBTQ + community.

“The children who come to the library, to see the performance is so important, so books like ‘George’ and other children’s books that we have a large collection of, we made sure that was included in the donation,” Wallace said.

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The Pride Book sale runs until the end of June. The store is open Monday through Saturday.

Copyright 2021 by WKMG ClickOrlando – All rights reserved.



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Cuomo’s last cynical stone wall over his outrageous book deal https://stetmagazine.com/cuomos-last-cynical-stone-wall-over-his-outrageous-book-deal/ https://stetmagazine.com/cuomos-last-cynical-stone-wall-over-his-outrageous-book-deal/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 23:35:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/cuomos-last-cynical-stone-wall-over-his-outrageous-book-deal/ Lawyers for Governor Cuomo are really scraping the bottom of the barrel to protect their client from yet more scandals. The problem now is to ask questions about possible illegal work by staff on the government book project, which brought in $ 5.12 million. Specifically, a series of Times Union Freedom of Information Act requests. […]]]>


Lawyers for Governor Cuomo are really scraping the bottom of the barrel to protect their client from yet more scandals.

The problem now is to ask questions about possible illegal work by staff on the government book project, which brought in $ 5.12 million. Specifically, a series of Times Union Freedom of Information Act requests.

Requests that Cuomo’s attorneys have denied, citing a FOIL exception for law enforcement records whose disclosure could jeopardize an ongoing investigation.

Huh? Yes, the Assembly impeachment inquiry is looking at (supposedly) the deal on the book as well as the government’s cover-up of nursing home deaths and other issues. But the TU wants to see the timesheets of his assistants which Cuomo says prove his innocence, as well as correspondence between the governor’s office and the Joint Commission on Public Ethics, which allegedly agreed to the deal’s deal. book provided it does not use the state. resources to write it.

None of this is a law enforcement record, so it’s hard to see how the exemption applies. His attorneys also cite a law that protects ethics committee documents – but Cuomo’s own office issued one of those same letters in April: this an illegal action?

The courts will eventually sort this out, but for now, Cuomo’s stone wall protects him from even more bad news – which he will surely consider “old news” when the truth finally comes out.

It’s a really cynical game, but one he can afford: $ 5 million in “blood money” will pay a lot of legal fees.



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Meticulously forged 17th-century music books discovered in a Venetian library https://stetmagazine.com/meticulously-forged-17th-century-music-books-discovered-in-a-venetian-library/ https://stetmagazine.com/meticulously-forged-17th-century-music-books-discovered-in-a-venetian-library/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 04:33:11 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/meticulously-forged-17th-century-music-books-discovered-in-a-venetian-library/ The manuscripts include foundational arias from the history of opera, a genre that emerged in the early 17th century. Credit: Michel Garrett, Penn State In 1916 and 1917, a musician and bookseller by the name of Giovanni Concina sold three richly decorated 17th-century songbooks to a library in Venice, Italy. Now, over 100 years later, […]]]>


The manuscripts include foundational arias from the history of opera, a genre that emerged in the early 17th century. Credit: Michel Garrett, Penn State

In 1916 and 1917, a musician and bookseller by the name of Giovanni Concina sold three richly decorated 17th-century songbooks to a library in Venice, Italy. Now, over 100 years later, a Penn State musicologist has discovered that the manuscripts are fakes, meticulously crafted to look old but actually fabricated just before they are sold to the library. Manuscripts are rare among musical forgeries as long as the songs are genuine, but the books are counterfeit.

Uncovering deception was not what Marica Tacconi, professor of musicology and associate director of the Penn State School of Music, set out to do when she began her research at the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice in 2018. While on her sabbatical there, she had planned to spend the fall semester studying “echo effects” in 17th century music – phrases that are sung by the lead singer and then repeated “in echo” by one or more additional singers.

While searching the library’s database for songs incorporating echo effects, Tacconi came across a particular book. Cataloged as 17th century, it certainly looked the part. It was bound in worn leather and embellished with brass bosses or metal knobs that serve to elevate and protect the book from the table surface. Inside, the paper showed some signs of deterioration, even including an occasional wormhole. The first page revealed an elaborate letter “T”, indicating the beginning of the song “Tu mancavi a tormentarmi” by Antonio Cesti. The music itself was written with heart-shaped note heads, and the bottom of the page displayed the coat of arms of the Contarini family, one of the most important and influential Venetian families.

“It was a beautiful and elegantly produced book,” Tacconi said. “I was immediately intrigued. But I also felt that something was wrong.

Teach students about manuscripts

Marica Tacconi, professor of musicology and associate director of the Penn State School of Music, teaches the manuscripts to students at Penn State. Credit: Michel Garrett, Penn State

Further research led to the discovery of two other manuscripts, also sold by Concina and very similar in format, design and content. Considered as a set, the three books preserve 61 compositions by 26 Italian composers, all written between 1600 and 1678. According to Tacconi, an expert in the music, art and culture of modern Italy, the typical music of the 17th century anthologies focus on one or a few composers.

“The books included a strange conglomerate of composers, from very famous ones, like Giulio Caccini, Claudio Monteverdi and Francesco Cavalli, to lesser known names. This was unusual in the 17th century, when music anthologies tended to have more monographic content, ”she said. “Moreover, 17th-century scribes would not have had access to such a wide range of music, as many of these pieces had not yet been printed and existed only in manuscripts that did not circulate widely.

Despite her suspicions about the authenticity of the manuscripts, Tacconi was enthusiastic about the music itself.

Music example

Considered as a set, the three books found by Tacconi retain 61 compositions by 26 Italian composers, all written between 1600 and 1678. Credit: Michel Garrett, Penn State

“The manuscripts include arias that have been fundamental in the history of opera – a genre that emerged in the early 17th century,” she said. “They include musical gems that can tell us a lot about the origins and development of opera.”

Upon further investigation, she realized that much of the music in the manuscripts had been extracted, note by note, from a number of music books of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. century.

“The music copied from the manuscripts exhibited some strange editorial quirks that you can see in early 20th century editions, but which would not have appeared in 17th century sources,” said Tacconi, who conducted a review. detailed comparison of manuscripts with more modern books.

This kind of careful comparison has proven to be particularly fruitful in proving the fabricated nature of the manuscripts. Tacconi’s knowledge of a little-known twentieth-century book in particular, “Handbuch der Musikgeschichte” by Hugo Riemann (1912), verified his suspicions. For example, one of the manufactured manuscripts included the song “Torna o torna pargoletto” by Jacopo Peri, which originally appeared in “Musiche” by Piero Benedetti – a songbook published in 1611. Riemann included it in its “Handbuch”, but with some modifications. Tacconi noticed these small but significant variations – a wrong note, a misspelling of a word.

“It was obvious that the maker copied the music from Riemann’s 1912 publication and not the 1611 copy,” she said. “It was the ‘smoking gun,’ confirmation that these books were indeed fake.”

Tacconi noted that the books are unique among musical forgeries in that most forgeries falsify the music itself.

“While the music preserved in these books is authentic, the manuscripts themselves are the work of one or more manufacturers who, working with several scribes and decorators, have deployed extraordinary means to make the volumes appear authentic,” said she declared. “The books were clearly designed to resemble those created for large Venetian homes in the 17th century. It’s no surprise that library staff didn’t recognize them as fakes. At first glance, they seem genuine, but once we take a close look at the music and notice the editorial quirks, we detect the subtle traces of a 20th century maker.

Tacconi said it’s impossible to know if Concina, who died in 1946, was the mastermind behind the fakes or if he came into possession of the books without knowing their fabricated nature.

Regardless of who generated the fakes, an important question is “Why did they do it?” “

“Monetary gain was probably not the primary driver,” Tacconi said, explaining that the library paid Concina the equivalent of about $ 220 in today’s cash for one of the manuscripts. “It’s a relatively small amount, which doesn’t really justify all the time and effort put into producing these books. Instead, what we have perhaps is an example of manufacturers eager to cheat the experts. “

Plus, she said, the forgers could have been motivated by a love for the music and the times. “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery,” after all.

“Twentieth-century musicians and publishers often idealized seventeenth-century music as particularly elegant, and this elegance is something you see very clearly in the visual aspects of the three manuscripts,” Tacconi said. “They are beautiful and ornate; their decorations include butterflies, birds and cupids; the notes are heart shaped. The fact that forgers strove to represent this elegance tells us something about the attitudes of forgers towards the music of this era. Now knowing that these books were created in the early twentieth century, the manuscripts and their content actually provide an opportunity to study the late Romanticist tradition known as “arie antiche” or “gemme antiche”, which has seen collectors of music, musicians and audiences are drawn to the antiquity of Italian Baroque solo vocal music.

Reference: “Three Forged“ Seventeenth-Century ”Venetian Songbooks: A Cautionary Tale” by Marica S. Tacconi, Spring 2021, 17th century music journal.
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Fiction for older children – reviews | Children’s books: 8-12 years old https://stetmagazine.com/fiction-for-older-children-reviews-childrens-books-8-12-years-old/ https://stetmagazine.com/fiction-for-older-children-reviews-childrens-books-8-12-years-old/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/fiction-for-older-children-reviews-childrens-books-8-12-years-old/ OOne of the few truly magical things that has happened in the past year is the way a footballer has shamed a government for feeding children. Manchester United striker Marcus Rashford MBE is a natural poster boy for watching tough difficulties and working dials on moral compasses. It makes perfect sense that he wrote a […]]]>


OOne of the few truly magical things that has happened in the past year is the way a footballer has shamed a government for feeding children. Manchester United striker Marcus Rashford MBE is a natural poster boy for watching tough difficulties and working dials on moral compasses. It makes perfect sense that he wrote a motivational self-help book for kids (with Carl Anka).

Quite conversational for the reluctant reader, but actually full of top-level sport psychology and no little depth, You are a champion: how to be the best you can be (Macmillan) also marks the start of a book club for underprivileged children – and WH Smith will be donating a copy to the National Literacy Trust for every copy sold.

Magic can be controversial, however. Not in the sense that American fundamentalists denounce Harry Potter, but in the sense that he sometimes provides a cheap way out of a plot. A selection of books from this season revolve around some otherworldly powers, but this is the internally consistent material of fable and legend, not just Deus Ex machina Hocus Pocus.

Efua Traoré, author of Children of the Quicksands. Photography: Boubacar Traoré

Kirsty Applebaum’s setup Life and time by Lonny Quicke (Nosy Crow) is captivating. Young Lonny is a living person, a person who can save dying creatures – moths, rabbits, humans – but pays for him with free time.

As a result, his family lives deep in a forest to protect Lonny from those who will not have his best interests at heart. A series of crises pushes Lonny into the world, where the contrast between what he has been told and the villagers’ beliefs about the living makes him let his guard down …

In Nigeria, where Efua Traoré’s protagonist, Simi, is a pampered city dweller, addicted to wifi and transported around Lagos in a middle-class bubble. Unexpectedly, she is sent to spend time in an off-grid village with a grandmother she has never met.

Children of the quicksand (Chicken House) is full of secrets and myths that we uncover alongside Simi, whose mother raised her far from the old-fashioned reach of her own mother, priestess of the Yoruba deity Oshun. Drawn to a power greater than her own will, Simi discovers a forbidden quicksand lake, what lurks beneath it, and what it means for her broken family.

Now let’s move on to Australia, where Meixing Lim does her best to fit into a baffling new culture as local skinheads put up anti-China posters and her family suffers setbacks after setbacks. There is, however, a mysterious cat, guardian of the shattered greenhouse in the garden, who only shows his fantastic treasures to those who need them most, when they need them most. A greenhouse of stars by Shirley Marr (Usborne) is full of ghosts, expanding homes, and how unexpected friends and the kindness of strangers can make all the difference. The most magical kind of magic is unforced and obvious – a childish version of magical realism, if you like.

Two reality checks balance fables and fantasies in the excellent Tic (Walker) by MG Leonard, rightly famous for her Beetle boy series. Its latest is a twisty, thriller-like tale of a mad bird boy, tyrants, and an escaped convict hiding in the nearby woods looking for the millions known to be hidden there. It all depends on who Twitch, 12, has to trust: the ex-bully, whose olive branches may be fake, or his mysterious new birdwatcher friend.

At the upper end of the age range is Something i said (Bloomsbury) by actor and comedian Ben Bailey Smith, who has a side career as rapper Doc Brown (OK: he’s also Zadie Smith’s little brother). When the gentle-mannered Carmichael – Car for short – unexpectedly gets enraged during his school talent show, the wild burns about his family and teachers go viral and he is suspended. Next thing, however, an American comedy show wants to fly him to be on TV, much to his family’s chagrin. This wise and warm book is big because it is made up of equal parts of intrigue and comedic riffs, all of which feel essential to its snorting charm.

  • To order any of these books at a special price, click on the titles or go to guardianbookshop.com. Delivery charges may apply



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How a book corner in a South Dallas mini-market turned into a community library https://stetmagazine.com/how-a-book-corner-in-a-south-dallas-mini-market-turned-into-a-community-library/ https://stetmagazine.com/how-a-book-corner-in-a-south-dallas-mini-market-turned-into-a-community-library/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 10:01:39 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/how-a-book-corner-in-a-south-dallas-mini-market-turned-into-a-community-library/ Tucked away in the corner of a small brick store is a commercial-sized store, top loading beverage cooler. But instead of soda, juice, and water, he’s almost to the brim with books. Some are in perfect condition, some are slightly worn. The four tightly packed aisles are filled with snacks, canned goods, and cleaning supplies. […]]]>


Tucked away in the corner of a small brick store is a commercial-sized store, top loading beverage cooler.

But instead of soda, juice, and water, he’s almost to the brim with books. Some are in perfect condition, some are slightly worn.

The four tightly packed aisles are filled with snacks, canned goods, and cleaning supplies. Four refrigerators line a wall facing the cash register.

To a passing customer, the books may seem out of place. For regulars, they have become a must.

Allen’s grocery store is located on the corner of Lawrence and Stephenson streets in South Dallas – near Elsie Faye Heggins Street. For six decades, it has been the perfect place for a cold drink or a quick bite to eat.

In recent years, it has also served as a community library, following a conversation between a mother and her 3-year-old son.

Books donated to the community lie in an old reused refrigerator inside Allen’s, a South Dallas grocery store, on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 (Lola Gomez / The Dallas Morning News)(Lola Gomez / photographer)

“What are we doing for fun that doesn’t cost money?” Nelly Cuenca asked her son, Bean.

“We read every day,” he says.

Cuenca is the founder of MaaPaa, a non-profit organization that supports single mothers raising sons. The organization provides material goods and runs emotional support groups, in addition to other services, to families in need.

When she heard Bean’s response, she asked how they could support MaaPaa Moms more.

“We can create a library,” Bean said.

Cuenca tried to find a way to gently reject the idea of ​​his son. There was no way for the two of them to create a library. They didn’t even have a building. It didn’t stop Bean.

Bean has spent a lot of time at Allen’s because his grandmother, Silvina Nohemi Cuenca, has worked there for almost 20 years.

One day he asked his grandmother if he could claim a corner of the store for the library. She gave him the OK, without thinking about it.

But soon after, his grandson showed up at the store with 10 books he had grown too big. Then Nelly Cuenca recorded a video of Bean asking for donations and shared it on social media.

“It went viral,” she said.

“People started cleaning their own closets and taking out books. Before you knew it, we had distributed 5,000 books. “

Filled with books

Although Allen is already a neighborhood landmark, it quickly morphed into a mini community center. It has become the home of regular reading circles for the children of the region and the children of MaaPaa mothers.

LaJuana McQueen, who grew up a few blocks from Allen, has seen the library grow since its inception. At first, the few donated books were located near the register. McQueen noticed this because she often stopped by for after-school snacks for her nieces.

It didn’t take long for the girls to ask to go to the store for more books. McQueen also took his 2-year-old grandson to reading circles before the pandemic put them on hiatus.

“There are a lot of kids in the neighborhood now,” McQueen said. “So that they have the opportunity to go get books and have something to read, that’s the best.”

The Martin Luther King branch library is closest to the grocery store. For those who don’t have a library or transportation card for the three-mile trip, Bean’s Book site is the perfect solution.

Nelly Cuenca tells customers to keep the books because they get so many donations, but most people give them back for others to benefit.

Bean’s viral video, now 5, has since died out, but the donations haven’t stopped.

Aidee Lomeli of Fort Worth, enlists the help of firefighters Will Tabor and Richard Courts of Dallas Fire Station 24 to bring donated books to Allen's, a South Dallas grocery store, on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 (Lola Gomez / The Dallas Morning News)
Aidee Lomeli of Fort Worth receives help from firefighters Will Tabor and Richard Courts of Dallas Fire Station 24 to bring donated books to Allen’s, a South Dallas grocery store, on Tuesday, March 16, 2021 (Lola Gomez / The Dallas Morning News)(Lola Gomez / photographer)

Nelly Cuenca connected to Aidee Lomeli via LinkedIn. The Fort Worth resident used to work for the Boys and Girls Club and she finds donors in Dallas and beyond to collect books aboard the wagon.

When the first two spoke, Nelly Cuenca told him how the mini-library was born.

Lomeli now asks people she knows about donated books and brings them with her whenever she visits Dallas.

“I know people who have kids, and as the kids get older you erase the books and sometimes you just don’t know what to do with them,” she says.

Bean’s dreams

The library inspired the Cuencas to continue their literary adventures. Nelly Cuenca and Bean are co-authors of a book to be published this fall. It is the first of what Nelly Cuenca calls a “Bean Series”.

Because Bean is homeschooled, he spends a lot of time listening to his mom’s virtual calls and seminars. Once, after leaving a meeting about mental health, Bean asked about bipolar disorder.

“Then I recognized, how many people talk to their kids about mental health?” she asked.

“This is how this small series was born. These will be short readings, maybe 14 pages. But they’re all based on actual conversations I had with my son.

After their first book is published, Bean can cross off a goal on his bedroom whiteboard: become an author before age 10. His other aspirations are longer term: to travel in space, to become a pilot and to be president.

One of her mother’s many goals is to expand the community library initiative in South Dallas.

“If there’s a mom-and-pop store on 75217 or 75228, they can call us and say, ‘Hey, we’ve got room. Bring your books, ”said Nelly Cuenca.

She added that Bean’s library has had more than just an impact on the community.

Her son taught her not to wait to make her dreams come true.

“If you really want to do something, you can do it now,” she said.

“Align yourself with the people who are going to uplift you and make it happen.”



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For 98-year-old author, finishing the first book is bittersweet https://stetmagazine.com/for-98-year-old-author-finishing-the-first-book-is-bittersweet/ https://stetmagazine.com/for-98-year-old-author-finishing-the-first-book-is-bittersweet/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 17:13:22 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/for-98-year-old-author-finishing-the-first-book-is-bittersweet/ For 98-year-old author, finishing the first book is bittersweet Lou Moore completed his life’s work, a memoir of his 74-year marriage. But the completion of the writing of “Eternal Love” did not turn out as he had imagined. Moore talks to Claudine Wong of KTVU about love and loss. Lou Moore, will tell you, he […]]]>


Lou Moore, will tell you, he always imagined that after he finished his book, he would sit down with his wife Nellie and read their love story together. “But it wasn’t meant to be,” he said calmly, “Nellie passed away before I could finish.”

And so surrounded by photos of the woman he has loved for three quarters of a century, he ended their story in his book, Eternal Love. Her motivation is pretty simple, “because Nellie was my life, we were both approaching 98 and I thought I should write about Nellie. The world I thought I had to know about Nellie, because I don’t believe that there could be another marriage around the world that had the same huge effect on a man by a woman like Nellie. “

His book covers their life and their history.

Born in San Francisco, raised in Brooklyn, Lou served in World War II. Nellie and her family survived life in a Japanese internment camp.

“And the fact that she is of 2nd generation Japanese descent and that I am a 3rd generation Chinese and shortly after the war it was amazing that we saw each other and fell in love without too many words”, says Moore

Lou remembers the first time he saw Nellie. It was 1946 and she was playing in a choir line. “I couldn’t take my eyes off her for the reason that I don’t know,” he said, “And I didn’t see her again until June 1, 1946, when she was having a cup of coffee at lunch. Hansen’s pharmacy. and when I saw her through the store window, drinking that cup of coffee in my chest, I almost broke out with anxiety. “

He asked her if he could sit down, she said yes, the next day he said he kissed her. Ten days later, they got married.

It’s one of her favorite memories: “And when I asked her to marry me, she said I wanted to be your wife.”

It’s the start of an incredible life together. “We loved each other and devoted ourselves to a depth that I think no couple has ever experienced in our lifetime. We’ve been married 74 years.”

In his book “Eternal Love”, Lou talks about their friendship with actor Ernest Borgnine and their careers and struggles. But it all comes back to Nellie and their love.

She passed away on October 18, 2020 and it made both eyes cry as he remembered that last day.

“I rushed to his bed.” Lou said in a calm voice. “And I touched her arm and it was still soft and tender and when I leaned in to kiss her I was shocked I saw tears in her eyes and I screamed that she didn? is not dead, she is not dead, she is not dead, she is alive, she is crying but the nurse who was with me told Mr. Moore that these are not his tears, these are your tears, your tears have touched his face. “

Lou says he hopes his book will inspire women to seek their own undying love and encourage husbands to cherish their wives,

“When was the last time you told your wife you loved her?” He asks, “Nellie and I have been married for 74 years and we have said it everyday, I love you , I love you I love you.” He says Nellie always said it all in threes. “We kissed like we kissed on June 2, 1946, that’s how a wedding should be.”

His book is a tribute, and in its pages he is again where he is with his Nellie.

“I have read the book several times 20 to 30 times since she passed away because I relive those moments that we lived,” he says, “and I have always believed as you noted that one day I will go to heaven and we will be together, together, together again to embrace and hold and continue the second phase of eternal love. “



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Book explores the civil rights movement; Delano Middleton’s Story Shared Through Fiction | https://stetmagazine.com/book-explores-the-civil-rights-movement-delano-middletons-story-shared-through-fiction/ https://stetmagazine.com/book-explores-the-civil-rights-movement-delano-middletons-story-shared-through-fiction/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/book-explores-the-civil-rights-movement-delano-middletons-story-shared-through-fiction/ Zachary Middleton finds it important to connect the dots between the historic civil rights movement and contemporary youth culture. He hopes his new historical fiction book that explores the life of his great-uncle who died in the Orangeburg Massacre will help him do so. On February 8, 1968, three students were killed and 28 others […]]]>


Zachary Middleton finds it important to connect the dots between the historic civil rights movement and contemporary youth culture. He hopes his new historical fiction book that explores the life of his great-uncle who died in the Orangeburg Massacre will help him do so.

On February 8, 1968, three students were killed and 28 others were injured when SC Highway Patrol soldiers opened fire on crowds of protesters following three nights of escalating racial tensions over efforts to to desegregate the All-Star Triangle Bowl.

South Carolina State College students Henry Smith and Samuel Hammond, as well as Wilkinson High School student Delano Middleton, 19, were killed.

Delano Middleton was the uncle of Zachary’s father, Alonzo Middleton, a longtime Orangeburg businessman who recently retired after 36 years in the insurance industry.

Zachary said his self-published book “Running After Delano” focuses on the life of Delano through the lens of Alonzo, who was only 10 years old when Delano was killed.

“This is the personality of Delano Middleton. Who was he as a person? I was fortunate enough to sit down with about 22 people who were alive during that time, knew the community and knew him, ”Middleton said.

“I wanted our young people to be able to connect the dots between the historic civil rights movement and what is happening now. So there are a lot of ways that I try to do this in the story, but at least I try to keep the integrity of the real events that happened during that time, ”he said.

The 33-year-old continued, “The schedule has been drawn between a six-month period, but he’s focusing on some of his ups and downs. I wanted to tell it through my father’s lens, through the lens of a 10-year-old child, a bit like a “ To Kill a Mockingbird ”, or “ Monday’s Not Coming ”, to have the competence of a young being what. structure something that’s a very deep subject, something really difficult.

In the book, which is just over 100 pages long, he explores who Delano was among those who knew him best.

“Delano was the person running the plow for the family. He was a person with a good sense of humor. He was a person who was about 6-4 ”or 6-5” tall. According to people close to him, he was pushing. His best friend said he was recruited by the state of Kansas to play football.

“One of the things he shared was the fact that he had dreams. He wanted to own a property, he wanted to get a type of household that was behind Whittaker. Whittaker is what African Americans of that time held a special place, ”said Middleton.

“These are stories that have never been shared, and I think it helps young people see and say, ‘Hey, I can be a good steward of my life. You never know how much time you have, but I can keep progressing, so that’s the hope, ”he said.

Middleton said his book was among the first books to come out for a company he started.

“This will be one of the starter books from a company I created called Grace to Cultivate LLC. We’re going to do a lot of things. We’re a brand of imagination and we’ll do a lot of things from there. writing from a social media point of view and point of view, ”he said.

Middleton said that while realizing that the Orangeburg massacre was a painful part of history, especially for his father, there were ways to overcome the injury and do productive things for the community in the ‘to come up.

“It’s actually part of the end of the book. At the end of the book, one of the things I do is be intentional to show this story too, the image of my dad coming back to his town. Born in Orangeburg. He and my mom had a business for 36 years. It’s an incredible tribute, “said Middleton.

“They were married at Greater Faith Baptist Church, where I am associate minister. In this same church, they made a commitment and made a commitment to the community and the people here in Orangeburg. So it’s definitely part of the story, ”he said.

Middleton’s book can be purchased through Amazon at the following link: www.amazon.com/Running-After-Delano-Zachary-Middleton-ebook/dp/B093PCQCZV. Fifteen percent of the net proceeds will go to Orangeburg-based charities.



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KSBY concludes “If you give a book to a child” campaign with a second book distribution https://stetmagazine.com/ksby-concludes-if-you-give-a-book-to-a-child-campaign-with-a-second-book-distribution/ https://stetmagazine.com/ksby-concludes-if-you-give-a-book-to-a-child-campaign-with-a-second-book-distribution/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 19:49:56 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/ksby-concludes-if-you-give-a-book-to-a-child-campaign-with-a-second-book-distribution/ Over the past two weeks, two local schools that have been the beneficiaries of KSBY’s “If You Give a Child a Book” campaign have had their second and final book distribution. The campaign, which began in September, raised $ 30,000 raised through the Scripps Howard Foundation, KSBY employees and community members. As a result, students […]]]>


Over the past two weeks, two local schools that have been the beneficiaries of KSBY’s “If You Give a Child a Book” campaign have had their second and final book distribution. The campaign, which began in September, raised $ 30,000 raised through the Scripps Howard Foundation, KSBY employees and community members. As a result, students at Oceano Elementary School and Arellanes Elementary School received eight to nine new books through a book distribution held in January this year and a book fair held this month. -this.

The second time around, the students were able to choose between four and five new books.

The summer holidays are not the only thing that worries the pupils of the Arellanes and Oceano primary schools. As teachers prepare to send their students to the next level, their students are opening a home library that they can refer to over the coming months.

“Oh my God, they were so excited,” said Laura Eledge, a first grade teacher at Oceano Elementary School. “A lot of our students don’t have the books readily available all the time, so having these new quality books with all the cool stuff they love, I think it’s going to really motivate them to read during the summer, their to talk about books and even want to share them with their brothers and sisters. “

Shannon Pimentel, San Luis Obispo County Raising a Reader Coordinator, says reading will not only keep students engaged this summer, but also prepare them for the next school year.

“Every time you pack that summer beach bag to go to the park or the beach, throw some books,” Pimentel said. “Anytime you put your child in bed or sit on the couch, take those books and take those moments to snuggle up and just enjoy and have conversations.”

While the months of June, July, and August can mean stepping out of the routine, Pimentel says it’s important for students to read or to be read to each other every day.

“So parents take this opportunity to make sure children have access to books as well as access to their time to snuggle up and explore books together,” Pimentel said. “Children will have many opportunities to pursue this language and literacy component.”

Related content:
Books purchased as part of the “If You Give A Book To A Child” fundraiser distributed to local schools



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Salina Area United Way hosts children’s book drive https://stetmagazine.com/salina-area-united-way-hosts-childrens-book-drive/ https://stetmagazine.com/salina-area-united-way-hosts-childrens-book-drive/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 12:08:28 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/salina-area-united-way-hosts-childrens-book-drive/ Young people choose free books during the United Way’s RAWR Week of Action in the Salina region in the summer of 2020. Photo courtesy of Salina Area United Way “/>Young people choose free books during the United Way’s RAWR Week of Action in the Salina region in the summer of 2020. Photo courtesy of Salina […]]]>


Young people choose free books during the United Way’s RAWR Week of Action in the Salina region in the summer of 2020. Photo courtesy of Salina Area United Way “/>
Young people choose free books during the United Way’s RAWR Week of Action in the Salina region in the summer of 2020. Photo courtesy of Salina Area United Way

United Way of the Salina region is restocking its supply of children’s books and needs your help!

The organization is organizing a collection of children’s books from Tuesday until June 11. Drop off new and used children’s books (newborn to high school) at 113 N. Seventh Street between 9 am and 3 pm Monday through Friday.

“Because the United Way’s summer reading program in the Salina area, Raising Active Wild Readers, successfully distributed 2,030 books last summer, we need to restock. The RAWR program is asking for donations of picture books and hardback books, beginner and advanced chapter books, graphic novels and culturally diverse books, ”said Brenda Gutierrez, United Way program director for the Salina region.

United Way of the Salina region is partnering with the USD 305 Summer Meal Service program to distribute books. Once the kids have grabbed their free sidewalk lunch, their next stop may be for a free book. Children are encouraged to make their choice of books, or United Way staff and volunteers will assist children who choose to stay in the vehicle.

“Books at home are a crucial part of early reading. Ultimately, reading ability impacts career choices in adulthood. Good readers have better futures, ”said Deb Kohn, School To Career coordinator at $ 305.

Show your support! Join United Way initiatives in the Salina region to improve early reading skills and keep students on track to graduate from high school so they are ready for college or a career. .

-SAUW-



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