Books – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 06:24:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://stetmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Books – Stet Magazine http://stetmagazine.com/ 32 32 Five books that help explain what’s going on in Afghanistan https://stetmagazine.com/five-books-that-help-explain-whats-going-on-in-afghanistan/ https://stetmagazine.com/five-books-that-help-explain-whats-going-on-in-afghanistan/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 04:00:32 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/five-books-that-help-explain-whats-going-on-in-afghanistan/ Updates to history books Sign up for myFT Daily Digest to be the first to know about the latest in history books. Over the past few weeks, Afghanistan has seen dramatic upheavals as the United States withdrew its last troops from the country, ending a two-decade military presence sparked by the September 11 terrorist attacks. […]]]>

Updates to history books

Over the past few weeks, Afghanistan has seen dramatic upheavals as the United States withdrew its last troops from the country, ending a two-decade military presence sparked by the September 11 terrorist attacks.

Intelligence agencies had warned that the US-backed government of President Ashraf Ghani could collapse within months of the US leaving under pressure from the Taliban – Islamist militants who ruled Afghanistan under the rule. strict Sharia law from 1996 until they were driven out by the US-led invasion. in 2001.

As it happens, Ghani fled – and the Taliban captured Kabul – two weeks before the last US troops left, ignominiously ending Washington’s political and military intervention. Afghans now face uncertain prospects under the renewed rule of the Taliban, who are themselves under fire from extremists in the Afghan branch of Isis.

Here are five books to read to understand Afghanistan’s troubled recent history, complex ethnic politics, America’s ill-fated war effort, and what could happen to us.

Afghanistan: a cultural and political history

Thomas barfield

This work by anthropologist Thomas Barfield takes readers of the pre-modern era through the early years of the ill-fated invasion of the United States. It highlights how decades of war at the end of the 20th century undermined Afghanistan’s institutions and social fabric, fueling cycles of increasingly brutal conflict in a country torn by ethnic divisions.

The Wrong Enemy: America in Afghanistan 2001-2014

Carlotta Gall

In this eyewitness testimony to the US war in Afghanistan, journalist Carlotta Gall focuses on the subversive role of neighboring Pakistan – and its inter-agency intelligence agency – in nurturing extremist Islamist groups even as Islamabad presented itself as an ally of the United States in the war on terror. .

No good man among the living: America, the Taliban and war through the eyes of the Afghans

Anand Gopal

In a masterpiece of narrative non-fiction, journalist Anand Gopal offers an intimate look at the conflict, retracing the lives of three Afghans: a Taliban commander, a US-backed warlord and a housewife from college graduate village trying to maintain neutrality. Through their stories, Gopal offers a devastating indictment of how the United States botched their plan in Afghanistan.

Dancing in the mosque: the letter from an Afghan mother to her son

Homeira Qaderi

This memoir by Homeira Qaderi, professor of Persian literature, chronicles his adulthood in Afghanistan amidst conflict and conservative social ideals in the 1980s, when he lived under the harsh rule of the Taliban. Raw but lyrical and nuanced, his book is presented as a burning letter to the son torn from his arms at only 19 months. A heartbreaking choice marks the end of the story.

ISIS in Khorasan: Afghanistan, Pakistan and the New Jihad in Central Asia

Antonio Giustozzi

Leading expert on the Islamic insurgency, Antonio Giustozzi explores the emergence of a local branch of the Islamic State in Afghanistan in recent years – its distinctive goals and strategies, and its complex and troubled relationship with the Taliban, now ready to lead Afghanistan for the foreseeable future.

Amy Kazmin is the FT’s office manager for South Asia

What books have we missed? Share your recommendations below and join our online reading group on Facebook at ft.com/ftbookscafe

More information on Afghanistan from FT Weekend

Mohsin Hamid on the case against the wars

As final disastrous foreign intervention comes to an end, Lahore-based novelist warns of pivot to new conflict

The last days of the “New Afghanistan”

From Kabul, stories of a generation living the last moments of a freedom that is all it has ever known


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Nine New Books We Can’t Wait To Read This Fall | Literature https://stetmagazine.com/nine-new-books-we-cant-wait-to-read-this-fall-literature/ https://stetmagazine.com/nine-new-books-we-cant-wait-to-read-this-fall-literature/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 09:10:44 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/nine-new-books-we-cant-wait-to-read-this-fall-literature/ Click to enlarge I was working as a literary arts coordinator when the pandemic hit, and a lot of the work was recommending books to clients and working with small newspaper publishers to make sure their work wasn’t being pushed to margin. Readers, even the most avid, suddenly had a shorter attention span for books. […]]]>

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I was working as a literary arts coordinator when the pandemic hit, and a lot of the work was recommending books to clients and working with small newspaper publishers to make sure their work wasn’t being pushed to margin.

Readers, even the most avid, suddenly had a shorter attention span for books. They wanted light, hopeful, or educational content. Stress and despair almost numbed them to great literature.

On the marketing side, that meant pushing the news into book clubs under labels such as “Short books for short attention spans.” Of course, reading interests change seasonally. I mean, no one brings Tolstoy to the beach! But it was something quite different. And, if I’m being honest, I was also in the throes of stagnation.

How do you get numb minds, including yours, to reopen a book?

My personal tips for finding amazing new works that inspire are: Pay attention to specific publishers, find works that established authors you revere talk about, and look for books by authors who will be visiting Rochester in the months to come.

Let’s hit it:

Adrienne Maree Brown’s “Grievers” (September 7)

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The number of Rochester readers devouring the works of Adrienne Maree Brown is staggering – and I’m thrilled with the love publisher AK Press receives by default.
Now the author of “Pleasure Activism”, “Emergent Strategy” and “We Will Not Cancel Us” has a new book – but it will be something different.

“Grievers” is Brown’s debut novel and launches the new press speculative fiction series, “Black Dawn”.

American Book Award winner Tananarive Due calls Brown “one of our most important voices in Afrofuturism and real world building and says of her latest work: Towards Hope in a Future Detroit.” Each paragraph is lovingly crafted, a story in itself, blending into a tapestry no reader will soon forget.

“The luminous novel” by Mario Levrero, translated by Annie McDermott

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Just as moviegoers trust production companies that regularly release award-winning films, some readers trust a small niche publisher with a solid reputation. I would definitely recommend subscribing to a small press like And Other Stories, which published Mario Levrero’s “The Luminous Novel” in August.

It’s easy to see why the book won an English Pen Award. I found myself laughing out loud while reading it in public. The Uruguayan author masters the hilarious and light nonsense, especially the defeatist diary entries of a writer trying to finish a novel after receiving a Guggenheim Fellowship.

And Other Stories says: “Insomniacs, romantics and anyone who has ever written (or failed to write) will fall in love with this fascinating masterpiece told by a true original, with all its infuriating flaws, her charming wit and intriguing reflections.

Colson Whitehead’s “Harlem Shuffle” (September 14)

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This fall’s next bestselling novel will likely be Colson Whitehead’s “Harlem Shuffle,” the sequel to his 2019 novel “The Nickel Boys,” which earned him his second Pulitzer Prize for fiction.

Whitehead’s countless accomplishments and awards make it such a simple and obvious recommendation. I would suggest having a book club for a pre-pub date.

The editor writes: “The ingenious story of Harlem Shuffle is set in a beautifully recreated New York City from the early 1960s. It’s a family saga disguised as a detective story, a hilarious morality play, a social romance about race. and power, and finally a love letter to Harlem.

“Tenderness” by Derrick Austin (September 21)

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I always keep an eye on BOA Editions, a small press based in Rochester which is very popular, especially when it comes to poetry.

“Trouble the Water,” a collection of poems capturing the queer black experience, previously published by Derrick Austin, won the A. Poulin Jr. Prize for Poetry. His new collection, “Tenderness,” won the Isabella Prize for Poetry Gardner 2021.

The editor calls the new poems lush and meditative, and says they “examine the tense nature of privacy in a nation poisoned by anti-darkness and homophobia.
“Even in the midst of heartbreak and pain, ‘Tenderness’ elevates common spaces as sites of resistance and healing, marvels at the restorative powers of erotic art and love, and celebrates the ability to friendship.”

“Foucault in Warsaw” by Remigiusz Ryzinski

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Another gem of the Rochester small press is the University of Rochester’s Open Letter Books. Open Letter mainly publishes literature in translation and has brought countless foreign authors and poets to our city. This is exactly what I’m talking about when I say you should subscribe to a little press that won’t disappoint.

“Foucault in Warsaw”, published in June, is an adventurous and philosophical account of the life of Michael Foucault in Poland in the late 1950s, when he became involved in the gay community and was then confronted with the police. secretive and forced to leave.

As the first page says, “The hero of this book is Michel Foucault. But not just him. Warsaw is too.

“In pursuit of Homer” by László Krasznahorkai (November 2)

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The New Directions Press is the kiss of the leader of contemporary avant-garde literature in translation, with gorgeous covers to boot. But the master of melancholy, the Hungarian author László Kraznahorkai, is perhaps, without doubt, one of the greatest literary giants of our time.

He has a cult – a cult that I am a part of – that is ready to drink the punch. He is perhaps best known for his novel “Sátántangó”, which Hungarian director Béla Tarr has adapted into a seven-and-a-half-hour film. (Fun fact: The Dryden played the entire adaptation in 2019, with no intermission, which almost never happens.)

“Chasing Homer” seems to have its own rhythm. The publisher describes it as “a classic escape nightmare. . . accelerated not only by the characteristic velocity of Krasznahorkai, but also by a unique musical score and intense illustrations. Buckle up.

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“The interim” by Wolfgang Hilbig (November 2)

If we were looking for the broken and tormented 21st century writer, with all the vices of the trope on top, it’s Hilbig.

Hilbig has five novels published by Two Lines and “The Interim”, set in post-war Germany, is his supposed masterpiece. The novel follows C., a renowned East German writer who frequents bars and brothels and travels between two Germans both literally and metaphorically on an expired visa.

If you’re one of those aforementioned numb readers, C.’s frustrations with diminished intellectual curiosity and blunt creativity will speak to you.

“All names given” by Raymond Antrobus (November 9)

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Did you know we had a Tin House editor hanging out in Rochester last year?

Elizabeth DeMeo, deputy editor-in-chief of the famous publishing house, was the first person to tell me about Raymond Antrobus. I fell in love with his collection of lyrical poems “Perseverance”, which won the Ted Hughes Prize, the Rathbones Folio Prize and the Somerset Maugham Prize, and was shortlisted for so many others.

So I was delighted to have got my hands on an advanced reader copy of “All Names Given”. Antrobus takes us around the world, from England, South Africa, Jamaica and the southern United States, as it considers its own ancestry, conflicting racial and cultural identities, and recounts the damage of colonialism.

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Rachel Cusk’s “Second Place”

I fell in love with Rachel Cusks’ “Outline” trilogy last year, but recommending it gets tricky when people ask, “What is it? This is because it is brilliantly without intrigue.

“Second Place,” which released in May but is a perfect fall read, isn’t exactly without intrigue. M is a young mother in search of freedom and autonomy – as we do, sigh – who invites a famous artist to her guesthouse and comes to believe that her vision could unravel the mystery of her life.

Cusk grabs you with his first line and doesn’t let go: “I told you once, Jeffers, about the time I met the devil on a train leaving Paris, and how after that encounter the evil that Usually found undisturbed beneath the surface things have risen and disgorged in every part of life.

Rachel Crawford is a literary collaborator for CITY. Comments on this story can be directed to Rebecca Rafferty, Editor-in-Chief of CITY, at becca@rochester-citynews.com.

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Collection of children’s books – the best new picture books and novels | Books https://stetmagazine.com/collection-of-childrens-books-the-best-new-picture-books-and-novels-books/ https://stetmagazine.com/collection-of-childrens-books-the-best-new-picture-books-and-novels-books/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/collection-of-childrens-books-the-best-new-picture-books-and-novels-books/ Tthe distant savagery of a Scottish island mixed with Celtic folklore and Hindu mythology: Jasbinder Bilan’s Aarti & the blue gods (Chicken House) is a gem for readers ages eight and up. Aarti lives alone with her demanding and cruel aunt, cut off from the world and her own history – until a boy is […]]]>

Tthe distant savagery of a Scottish island mixed with Celtic folklore and Hindu mythology: Jasbinder Bilan’s Aarti & the blue gods (Chicken House) is a gem for readers ages eight and up. Aarti lives alone with her demanding and cruel aunt, cut off from the world and her own history – until a boy is stranded on the beach and she makes an extraordinary discovery. Skilfully interweaving the tangible and the numinous, this adventure rich in layers confirms the striking and original talent of Bilan.

Of Scavengers author Darren Simpson comes Memory thieves (Usborne), a tense sci-fi thriller. In the Sanctuary Elsewhere, young residents, including Cyan, submit to Dr Haven’s memory modifications to escape deep-rooted trauma – but when Cyan finds a cryptic message etched into a whale skeleton and sees a new arrival resist the regime, he begins to rebel, too. Simpson combines quick visual storytelling with a complex and empowering message about coming to terms with the past.

My beautiful voice by Joseph Coelho. Illustration by Allison Colpoys

A philosophical autonomous, Poison for breakfast (Rock the Boat) by Daniel Handler alias Lemony Snicket, is told by the author, who realizes one morning that he is investigating his own murder. Where is he? Reading this little book gives the impression of opening a window to let in air and light. It’s filled with curious information and powerful feelings, and is alternately humorous, sad, meditative, and lovely – with ambiguous questions to ponder and savor.

For seven years and over, Maddy Yip’s Guide to Life Sue Cheung’s (Andersen) follows the eponymous heroine on a quest to discover her talent. Everyone has one, so surely she must too… but annoyed by an agonizing awkwardness, disgusting cakes and defiantly fleeing guinea pig assistants, will Maddy ever discover her unique gift? A very illustrated and often hilarious start for a new series.

Written by Polly, Geoffrey Faber’s granddaughter, and published, of course, by Faber, The cat from the book is illustrated with glittering-eyed charm by Clara Vulliamy. It’s the whimsical tale of Morgan, a wartime street kitten turned into a perfect publishing house cat under the auspices of TS Eliot. Morgan then trains other kittens as fellow writers to get them out of London – a sweet feline twist on the classic evacuee story.

The cat from Polly Faber's book.  Illustration by Clara Vulliamy
The cat from the book by Polly Faber. Illustration by Clara Vulliamy

A picture book for ages five and up, the magnificent My beautiful voice (Frances Lincoln) by Joseph Coelho, illustrated by Allison Colpoys, is a story that unfolds as delicately as a flower, infused with the swirls of vivid colors of Colpoys. The shy narrator doesn’t speak in class – until her teacher Miss Flotsam provides the perfect conditions for her to write a poem, and then recite it, in her newly discovered beautiful voice.

In picture books for young readers, two very fun counting books stand out. In 10 stupid children (Pavilion) new talent Jon Lander happily takes us from sane activities – sitting, bathing, cooking, gardening – to fold-out shutters in which extreme silliness reigns: think lions in disguise and worm pie feasts. . Everything is conveyed by hand-drawn pops of color that are playful and free, while the solemn injunctions not to open said flaps give the book a conspiratorial feel, perfect for reading aloud.

And Ten delicious teachers (Walker), by Ross Montgomery and Sarah Warburton, features a handful of carefree educators who missed the last bus home and take a shortcut through the forest – much to the delight of the hungry, brightly-colored monsters who walked them away. pick up, one by one. Funny and irreverent, it’s easy to imagine this one being a huge hit at school story time.

Also from Walker, Ergo, by Alexis Deacon and Viviane Schwarz, is the deceptively simple story of a little yellow chick discovering that she is not the world, nor her eggshell. Ergo’s progression from certainty to doubt, from exploration to new discovery, is comical, engaging and deeply stimulating, for readers of all ages.

Gathering of teenagers

The Upper World paperback - august 19, 2021

The upper world
by Femi Fadugba, Penguin, £ 7.99
When teenager Esso begins to glimpse the future, he is haunted by the sight of a bullet fired into an alley; but can the future be changed? Fifteen years later, Rhia is filled with questions about her parents and when she never met them. Does Dr. Esso have answers for her – or is her time travel talk just messed up? From the streets of Peckham and Streatham to the supernatural strangeness of the upper world, this superbly original debut album, written with extraordinary ambition and panache, a blend of theoretical physical effort and all too human tragedy.

Keith Gray's climbers

Climbers
by Keith Gray, Barrington Stoke, £ 7.99
Sully is the best tree climber in the village, until the boy who calls himself “Nottingham” appears. No one climbs Twisted Sister without at least seven falls, but Nottingham succeeds in their second attempt. Angry and unstable, Sully challenges Nottingham in a race – be the first to climb the impossible tree, the nameless tree. But will any of them make it to the top without tragedy? Spared, brief, crystal-clear, this short story from a multi-award-winning author distills the sensitivity to thin, sore skin of teens, desperate to both stand out and fit in.

The Sound of Everything by Rebecca Henry

The sound of everything
by Rebecca Henry, All with words, £ 8.99
Complex and difficult Kadie was returned from foster home to foster home, treason after treason. But if the noise of everyday life often threatens to overwhelm her, she has a talent for music that drives her to forge an unlikely alliance with Dayan, also a gifted musician. As envious girls start an online hate campaign against her, can Kadie bring herself to trust Dayan and let him in? A brilliantly assured first novel, evoking all the accumulated defensive wound of the child in series rejected.


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5 great fall book thrillers that aren’t Connelly or Clinton https://stetmagazine.com/5-great-fall-book-thrillers-that-arent-connelly-or-clinton/ https://stetmagazine.com/5-great-fall-book-thrillers-that-arent-connelly-or-clinton/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/5-great-fall-book-thrillers-that-arent-connelly-or-clinton/ On the bookshelf Five fall mysteries you shouldn’t miss If you purchase related books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores. This fall mysteries and thrillers are led by sure-fire captivating like ‘The Dark Hours’ by Michael Connelly, ‘Silverview’, John le Carré’s Latest Spy Festival, and […]]]>

On the bookshelf

Five fall mysteries you shouldn’t miss

If you purchase related books from our site, The Times may earn a commission from Bookshop.org, whose fees support independent bookstores.

This fall mysteries and thrillers are led by sure-fire captivating like ‘The Dark Hours’ by Michael Connelly, ‘Silverview’, John le Carré’s Latest Spy Festival, and Broadcast Journalist Tamron Hall’s Early Mysteries ( “As the Wicked Watch”) and Hillary Rodham Clinton (“State of Terror,” with successful veteran Louise Penny). But I’m mostly excited by five contenders flying a little lower under the radar, all of which are worth adding to your lineup.

These toxic things
By Rachel Howell Hall
Thomas and Mercer: 413 pages, $ 25
September 1st

The latest from the LA native and Times Book Prize finalist features Mickie Lambert, a young woman whose work on a digital album for a former curio store owner Santa Barbara Plaza is devastated by the woman’s death. Was it really suicide? The mysterious plots are winding and gripping, but it’s also worth noting the realistic rendering of a black neighborhood in LA locked in a battle for gentrification.

Book cover by "Harlem Shuffle" by Colson Whitehead

“Harlem Shuffle” by Colson Whitehead

(Doubleday Books)

Harlem Shuffle
By Colson Whitehead
Double day: 336 pages, $ 29
September 14

Sure, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner (“The Nickel Boys”, “The Underground Railroad”) tried his hand at mysterious tropes in “The Intuitionist,” but this one is firmly in the genre’s pocket. Starring a slightly ‘twisted’ furniture salesman from Striver’s Row caught on a wild adventure, the novel tackles the intricacies of a bygone New York, from the wonders of the World’s Fair to the despair of the Harlem riot.

Book cover by "The Betrayed Ninja" by Tori Eldridge

The Betrayed Ninja
By Tori Eldridge
Agora: 336 pages, $ 17
September 14

Eldridge takes Culver City-based Norwegian Chinese ninja Lily Wong and her mother from Los Angeles to Hong Kong amid pro-democracy protests and a high-stakes Wong family board meeting. Building on her fifth degree black belt experience in To-Shin Do ninjutsu, Eldridge established Lily in her first two ninja mysteries as a protector of women and youth; here she expands her portfolio to corporate and family intrigues, triads and even a bit romance.

Book cover for "Stay" by James Han Mattson

Stay
By James Han Mattson
Tomorrow: 416 pages, $ 28
October 5

Like “The Intuitionist” by Whitehead, “When No One Is Watching” by Alyssa Cole or “The Other Black Girl” “Reprieve” by Zakiya Dalila Harris overlaps genres in the best possible way. The murder in the late 1990s of a man at Quigley House, a full contact haunted house in Lincoln, Neb., In a contest gone awry, and the trial that followed are but one part of the story. It’s the compelling flashbacks from various candidates and others that lead Mattson to take a deeper look at America’s addiction to horror, occasional racism, the deteriorating political climate, and more. Sure to spark conversation and debate in book clubs across the country.

Book cover by "All his little secrets" by Wanda M. Morris

All his little secrets
By Wanda M. Morris
Tomorrow: 384 pages, $ 17
November 2

From a new perspective on the legal thriller, Ivy League-trained Ellice Littlejohn is the only black lawyer in a family law firm in Atlanta. Summoned one morning to the office of her boss, Michael, she finds the attorney general (and, oops, her lover) died from a seemingly self-inflicted injury. Things take a turn for the worse when she is quickly promoted to Michael’s old job and the cops come in to sniffle her, forcing her to juggle a family secret with the dawning awareness of something fishy going on in the executive suite.

Woods is a literary critic, editor and author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series.


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Jon Snow’s ending would be better with a cut book character https://stetmagazine.com/jon-snows-ending-would-be-better-with-a-cut-book-character/ https://stetmagazine.com/jon-snows-ending-would-be-better-with-a-cut-book-character/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 23:05:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/jon-snows-ending-would-be-better-with-a-cut-book-character/ Jon Snow had one of the best Game of Thrones endings, but it still could have been improved with a character from Wildling that the series didn’t include. Jon Snow had one of the best endings of Game Of Thrones, but it might have been even better with a cut book character. Game Of Thrones […]]]>

Jon Snow had one of the best Game of Thrones endings, but it still could have been improved with a character from Wildling that the series didn’t include.

Jon Snow had one of the best endings of Game Of Thrones, but it might have been even better with a cut book character. Game Of Thrones ended in 2019, concluding its story in a confrontational way to say the least. The ending (and really, the final episodes) proved hugely controversial for various twists and turns, character decisions, and pacing issues, but Jon Snow was one of the stronger arcs throughout.

After killing Daenerys, Jon Snow’s fate had to be brought back to life on the wall, joining all that was left of the Night’s Watch. Jon may have been the rightful heir to the Iron Throne, but his return Beyond the Wall, with Tormund and Ghost by his side, feels much more in tune with who he is and how he was shaped by his. experiences with Ygritte, Mance Rayder, and others. Jon’s ending in the Far North is the kind of bittersweet fate it’s easy to imagine George RR Martin has planned for him, too, though there could be a few differences.


Related: Game Of Thrones: How Jon Snow Will Be Resurrected In The Books

The show streamlined elements of Jon Snow’s arc, including what can be assumed to happen after his death. Jon’s resurrection will likely be different in The Winds of Winter, while Game Of Thrones cut a twist of Mance Rayder who kept the King Beyond the Wall alive with Rattleshirt was killed in his place, and another key element that was tweaked was the omission of Val, a Wildling who is the sister from Mance’s wife, Dalla (also cut off from the show). Good-looking, intelligent, and fierce, Val and Jon have great chemistry and a clear mutual attraction in the books, though he does pass on Stannis Baratheon’s offer to marry him, which would have resulted in him becoming legitimized as Lord Stark of Winterfell but renounce his vows. His story will likely drift away from Val in the books for a while, as his attentions focus more and more on the other side of the wall, but she represents a strong connection beyond for him that would have made Jon Snow ends north of the Wall feels even more like the right choice.

Val Wildling in ASOIAF

Val is a temptation for Jon; she represents the chance to have everything he dreamed of: Lord of Winterfell, a beautiful wife, a son – all things that he gave up on joining the Night’s Watch, and that he does again by staying true to His wishes. But Val also represents another part of Jon, which Ygritte also did, which is his Widling side. Jon does not fit the political landscape of Westeros; he’s a great leader in part because he’s so reluctant, but his heart is in the true North. Game Of Thrones shows this thanks to Ygritte and his friendship with Tormund, although it largely fails with his giant wolf, Ghost, who is the most significant manifestation of this aspect of him.

Including Val, then, would have bolstered Jon’s arc and the strength of his character and decisions, as well as his connection to the Wildlings. It is noteworthy that Jon in the books notes that Ghost and Val appear to be “go together,” which makes it seem like Jon and Val are more deeply connected than just flirting, and that there will be more to their story at the end. After all, Ghost is part of Jon, tied together as a warg, so at least part of Jon also belongs to Val.

It is likely that many aspects of Jon Snow’s story in The Winds of Winter and a dream of spring will follow the same main lines as Game Of Thrones, including the battle with the Others and his relationship with Daenerys (although this may be more of a political partnership than a romance). With that in mind, it’s easy to see why Val was cut, as this storyline was massively condensed (like with Mance’s death and a baby-switch arc that might have been too complicated for TV), so it would have. been introducing a character only for her to appear briefly. And Jon’s ending still works without her, but the idea of ​​him choosing to return Beyond the Wall in Game Of Thrones, and be with his “Wild Princess,” feels like an even more fitting ending to his story, while also being bittersweet as he leaves his family and the kingdom behind him, but returns to where he truly belongs with someone he loves.

Next: The Ending & The True Meaning Of Game Of Thrones Explained (In Detail)

Tony Soprano and Many Saints of Newark Cast

The Sopranos: Why Newark’s Many Saints Need a Sequel


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Pandemic fiction: fall books contain stories about the virus https://stetmagazine.com/pandemic-fiction-fall-books-contain-stories-about-the-virus/ https://stetmagazine.com/pandemic-fiction-fall-books-contain-stories-about-the-virus/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 17:48:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/pandemic-fiction-fall-books-contain-stories-about-the-virus/ This cover image posted by Knopf shows “The War for Gloria”, a novel by Atticus Lish, released on September 7th. (Knopf via AP) PA NEW YORK By the end of 2020, the pandemic had lasted long enough for author Jodi Picoult to attempt something that seemed unthinkable to early novelists – turning it into fiction. […]]]>

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This cover image posted by Knopf shows “The War for Gloria”, a novel by Atticus Lish, released on September 7th. (Knopf via AP)

PA

By the end of 2020, the pandemic had lasted long enough for author Jodi Picoult to attempt something that seemed unthinkable to early novelists – turning it into fiction.

“At the start of the pandemic, I couldn’t even read, let alone write. I didn’t have the focus, ”says Picoult, who began the novel“ Wish You Were Here ”last November. The fall outing takes place in New York and the Galapagos during the first two months of the pandemic, from March through May of last year.

“I couldn’t find myself in my own life; writing the book was therapeutic, “she added.” I finished a draft in February, very quickly. And all the time, I was talking to friends, I was telling them, “I don’t know if this is going to work. But I have had very positive responses and I have a feeling that, unlike almost every other topic, I wrote a book about this experience that everyone on the planet has had. “

From wars to plagues to the attacks of September 11, the literary response to historical tragedies has been a trauma-absorbing process – often beginning with poetry and non-fiction and, after months or years, has evolved into a trauma-absorbing process. extending to narrative fiction. The pandemic has now lasted a second fall season for publication, and a growing number of authors, including Picoult, Louise Erdrich, Gary Shteyngart and Hilma Wolitzer, have incorporated it into their final books.

Shtyengart’s “Our Country Friends” features eight friends who meet in a secluded house as the virus spreads, a storyline he took inspiration from Chekhov and other Russian writers, and the 14th century classic of Boccace “The Decameron”. Amitava Kumar’s “A Time Outside This Time” tells the story of an Indo-American author working at an artists retreat and trying to make sense of President Donald Trump, the 24-hour media and a virus just as relentless. Kumar started the book before the pandemic, but found it fitted well – too well – into an existing wave of disinformation, “fake news,” spanning the United States to his native India.

“The Indian Prime Minister was asking people to slam their plates and pots at a certain time; people in his Conservative party were touting the power of cow dung and cow urine, ”he says. “A Minister of Health said the sun’s rays would boost immunity. So, I was thinking, what exactly is the job that a novel can do in the days of the novel coronavirus?

“I’m telling you all of this because I had no doubts about mentioning the pandemic – I didn’t think it was preventable. “

Erdrich’s “The Sentence,” his first since Pulitzer-winning “The Night Watchman,” focuses on a 2020 Minneapolis bookstore and the city’s multiple crises, from the pandemic to the murder of George Floyd. Like Kumar, Erdrich had the original idea – a haunted bookstore – long before the virus spread.

“In the end, I realized that while we might want to forget parts of 2020, we shouldn’t forget,” she wrote in a recent email. “Obviously, we can’t forget. We must use what we have learned.

Wolitzer’s “The Great Escape” is a new story in his “Today a Woman Gone Mad at the Supermarket” collection, which includes a preface by “Olive Kitteridge” author Elizabeth Strout. “The Great Escape” is the first short work of fiction in years by Wolitzer, known for such novels as “The Doctor’s Daughter” and “An Available Man”. The 91-year-old author lost her husband to the virus and tapped into his grief by updating the characters from the previous stories, married couple Howard and Paulette.

“I found it cathartic,” Wolitzer says. “I wrote it in a week and I couldn’t stop writing about it. The images of what had happened to us kept coming back and I felt like I had to use them.

MORE NEW FICTION

This fall’s fiction will also include works by Jonathan Franzen, Sally Rooney, Lauren Groff, Colm Toibin and Strout, and four of the last six Pulitzer Prize winners in fiction: Erdrich, Richard Powers, Colson Whitehead and Anthony Doerr. “Silverview” is a posthumous release by John le Carré, who passed away last year. Gayl Jones’ “Palmares” is his first novel in over 20 years, and “Chronicles from the Land of the Happiest People on Earth” by Nobel Prize winner Wole Soyinka is the Nigerian playwright’s first novel in nearly 50 years.

Fiction is also expected from Percival Everett, Anita Kopacz, Atticus Lish and Amor Towles, and early novelists ranging from Honorée Fanonne Jeffers and Wanda M. Morris to the already famous Hillary Clinton, who teamed up with Louise Penny on the thriller “State of Terror”. . “

“There is a very comprehensive list of books to come. We have had a very good year of sales so far and I see this will only get stronger in the fall, ”said James Daunt, CEO of Barnes & Noble.

POETRY

Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman released two books this fall, the illustrated story “Change Sings” and the book of poetry “Call Us What We Carry”. Louise Glueck’s “Winter Recipes from the Collective” is her first book of poetry since winning the Nobel Prize last year, and new works are also expected from Pulitzer Prize winners Paul Muldoon, Frank Bidart and Tracy K Smith, and Kevin Young, Amanda Moore and Mai der Vang.

MEMORIES

Muldoon also took part in one of the most anticipated fall memoirs: “The Lyrics: 1956 to the Present” by Paul McCartney, a $ 79 double volume that the Irish poet helped edit. Hillary Clinton’s longtime assistant and ex-wife of former Rep Anthony Weiner Huma Abedin wrote “Both / And” and #MeToo pioneer Tarana Burke tells her story in “Unbound “.

Others with memoirs to come include Katie Couric, Jamie Foxx, James Ivory, Steve Van Zandt, Dave Grohl, Robbie Krieger and two basketball greats Dwyane Wade and Carmelo Anthony.

POLITICS

The summer’s bestseller lists included Trump-related works such as “I Alone Can Fix It,” and this fall will test the continued appeal of stories about the former president, with new work coming from Bob Woodward. and his Washington Post colleague Robert Costa (“Peril”), and ABC News correspondent Jon Karl (“Betrayal”).

Former national security official Fiona Hill, a key witness in Trump’s first impeachment trial, for pressuring Ukrainian leaders to investigate then-candidate Joe Biden tells her story in “There is nothing for you here”. Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie’s “Republican Rescue” is an attack on his party’s conspiracy theories, including that the election was stolen from Trump. Mollie Hemingway’s “Rigged” argues that “Democrats, Big Techs and the media built a machine to ensure that a Trump victory was impossible,” according to Regnery Publishing.

One political genre is largely absent: the books of opposition to a sitting president, a lucrative business under several previous administrations. Conservative books have a large audience; Right-wing commentator Mark R. Levin’s “American Marxism” has sold hundreds of thousands of copies this summer. But publishers and booksellers have struggled to name upcoming works that center on President Biden’s critique.

“The focus continues to be on Trump,” says Mark Laframboise, buyer for Politics & Prose bookstore in Washington, DC

Thomas Spence, editor of the conservative Regnery Publishing, said his company had benefited from books on President Bill Clinton and President Barack Obama, but didn’t even see any proposals on Biden.

“The Conservatives are not worried about him personally. They worry about the policies he’s pursuing, ”Spence says. “And it’s so different from the Clinton and Obama years when Regnery sold mountains of books criticizing these two presidents.”

THE STORY

The debate over the significance of the founding of the country continues with works by Pulitzer laureates Gordon Wood and Joseph Ellis, as well as 700 pages of Woody Holton’s “Liberty Is Sweet: The Hidden History of the American Revolution,” endorsed by Wood and by an author that he otherwise disagreed with the creator of the “1619 Project” Nikole Hannah-Jones.

A comprehensive edition of “Project 1619” expands on the Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times report, which, by placing slavery at the center of the American narrative, was either celebrated as a necessary corrective to mainstream history or condemned as unpatriotic, to the point of being banned from certain schools.

Hannah-Jones quotes Holton in the book “1619 Project”, which includes essays, poems, and fiction, with Jesmyn Ward, Terry McMillan, Terrance Hayes, and Jason Reynolds among contributors. In a note to readers, editor Chris Jackson of One World calls the book an exploration of the “twin lineage” of slavery and resistance, a conflict echoed in the subtitle of Ellis’ book, “The Cause: The American Revolution and Its Discontents. “

“The 1619 Project was never meant to be a mere academic argument or, worse, partisan politics,” writes Jackson, “but a story about what’s really at stake in how we view our history and our identity as that nation: our lives and our future This is a clarifying and often inspiring epic struggle, the end of which we can all write. “


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Book Review: “Neon Gods” | Books https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-neon-gods-books/ https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-neon-gods-books/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-neon-gods-books/ Commented by Salena Sullivan, Director of the Christiansburg Library. For readers who like Rachel Smythe’s “Lore Olympus” or want to see more of Hades and Persephone, Katee Roberts’ “Neon Gods” is a perfect choice. In this modernized account of classical myth, Persephone finds herself on the run from the machinations of Zeus and Demeter, his […]]]>





Commented by Salena Sullivan, Director of the Christiansburg Library.

For readers who like Rachel Smythe’s “Lore Olympus” or want to see more of Hades and Persephone, Katee Roberts’ “Neon Gods” is a perfect choice.

In this modernized account of classical myth, Persephone finds herself on the run from the machinations of Zeus and Demeter, his mother, who together conspire to ruin Persephone’s plans for her future.

After being caught off guard at a party, Persephone flees into the cold winter night with no hope or plan. She finds herself pursued and her only refuge is across the Styx, in the lower town and in the arms of a man who shouldn’t exist.

Hades has become a myth in the upper world, this is how he likes it. He watches for the perfect opportunity to take revenge on Zeus, an opportunity that presents itself on his knees with the arrival of Persephone.

Roberts’ novel is a quick and satisfying read that will leave readers eagerly awaiting the second book in the series. Hades and Persephone have incredible chemistry, both in the bedroom (and rec room) and outside. Hades is the perfect domineering love of cinnamon buns. He genuinely cares about the people who rely on him for their safety and is willing to risk his life for all of them, including Persephone. Persephone is able to flourish with him and truly show off the fiery personality she had to suppress in order to survive in the upper world. Their relationship is truly the star of the book. Hermes, Charon, and other supporting characters add color and help flesh out our character’s background, especially Hades. Readers are certainly hoping to see more in future articles.


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First two-day budget proposals on the books | The star https://stetmagazine.com/first-two-day-budget-proposals-on-the-books-the-star/ https://stetmagazine.com/first-two-day-budget-proposals-on-the-books-the-star/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/first-two-day-budget-proposals-on-the-books-the-star/ AUBURN – The formation of the 2022 county budget began after an eight-hour day of hearing proposals from county department heads and elected officials. This discussion continues today with another eight hour session and 13 presentations by heads of department and elected officials. Board chairman Rick Ring began Tuesday’s session by advising the board that […]]]>

AUBURN – The formation of the 2022 county budget began after an eight-hour day of hearing proposals from county department heads and elected officials.

This discussion continues today with another eight hour session and 13 presentations by heads of department and elected officials.

Board chairman Rick Ring began Tuesday’s session by advising the board that the main goal would be to align salaries.

“We have a little more money this year than we thought just because the growth quotient is higher at 4.2%,” Ring said. “I would like to say that we would be able to take care of everyone. I’m sure not everyone will be where they want to be, but we’ll do our best.

Tuesday’s discussion revolved around salaries as each department head or elected official made their way to the podium. Before leaving the podium, Ring made sure to ask if employee reviews were being submitted and if employees were participating in the IT department’s Know Before program.

The day began with presentations from the three county judges.

Superior Court Judge 2 Monte Brown spoke on behalf of the group, saying he believed the salaries paid to court staff were unfair and unjustified.

“Our staff are the lifeblood of the third floor of this courthouse,” said Brown. “Staff are important in the management of our courts, they are accountable to us and the Indiana Supreme Court.”

Brown said the recommendations made in budgets are lower than what the average paralegal does.

“Our staff need to be paid fairly, our budget figures that we have presented are going in the right direction,” he said.

All three judges said they constantly train their staff and all court reporters are certified as paralegals.

Circuit court judge Kurt Grimm said his staff could sit at a hearing, take notes and create the documents needed for a hearing.

“The ability to do this allows for efficient handling of cases,” said Grimm. “It’s a skill set that is learned over a long period of time. “

The day’s presentations were completed by Sheriff David Cserep II and Sheila Stonebraker, Evaluator.

The sheriff’s budget of nearly $ 5 million is the county’s largest proposal. Its budget, like others, included at least a 2.5% increase in employee salaries. It also includes several larger capital expenditures.

These capital expenditures included repairing the elevator at DeKalb County Jail, which is priced at $ 112,450. There is also a need for 55 new portable radios for staff, as well as HVAC repairs and five new vehicles.

The sheriff explained that his department uses a five-year rotation on all of their cars. This allows the department to get the most money for the vehicles at auction, as the vehicles will always have less than 100,000 miles on them.

While discussing his budget, Sheriff Cserep raved about the quality of his staff, as have all elected officials and department heads.

“These people are dedicated and do a great job, which is why we look good,” he said. “I want to keep these people. We have a great team and they work hard.

Council Chairman Ring echoed those sentiments.

“I am very grateful for the people we have,” Ring said.

Other presentations on Tuesday included Jason Meek, Homeland Security; Sandi Wilcox, Treasurer; Nellie Heffley, land and water; Holly Albright, City Clerk; Leta Hullinger, recorder; Jack Smith, IT; Becky Calhoun, Drug Free DeKalb; Kellie Knauer, Community Corrections; Chris Gaumer, development department; Brian Humbarger, E-911 and Doty Miller, human resources.


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Book Review: The Followers | ConchoValleyHomepage.com https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-the-followers-conchovalleyhomepage-com/ https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-the-followers-conchovalleyhomepage-com/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 13:14:00 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/book-review-the-followers-conchovalleyhomepage-com/ ENTERTAINMENT – Summer is in full swing but there is still time to add some books to your reading list. Followers: After spending 25 years in a cult and escaping 12 years ago, Radhia Gleis immersed herself in the idea of ​​”group thinking”. Gleis was a member of the Buddhafield cult which was led by […]]]>

ENTERTAINMENT – Summer is in full swing but there is still time to add some books to your reading list.

Followers:

After spending 25 years in a cult and escaping 12 years ago, Radhia Gleis immersed herself in the idea of ​​”group thinking”. Gleis was a member of the Buddhafield cult which was led by a man who had many nicknames: Michel, Andreas, The Teacher or Reyji.

A statement about the book reads: “What causes people to give up their will, their sense of right and wrong – to give up their moral compass and family ties for a person?” or an ideal? Gleis asks in his captivating new book, The Followers: “Holy Hell” and the Followers of Narcissistic Leaders: How My Years in Notorious Worship Parallel Today’s Cultural Mania, a nod to the cult documentary of Buddhafield 2016 Good heaven, in which it appears. Followers lays the groundwork by surveying Gleis’ education in Hollywood and retracing the stages of her adult life when, at the age of 30, she fell under the influence of the charismatic leader of Buddhafield. She draws striking parallels between her devotion to a cult leader – an authority – whose damaging behavior and influence she has deliberately ignored, and the followers of other authoritarian leaders, past and present.

Synopsis of Senora: This book is recommended for readers who enjoy psychology and politics. While giving us a glimpse behind the curtain of the cult of Buddhafield, Gleis clarifies that his book is not necessarily a memoir. Rather, she uses her experiences as a goal to study political and cultural climates.

About the Author: Author Radhia Gleis is a Certified Clinical Nutritionist, CCN, MEd. biochemical analyst and educator for over 33 years. She has appeared as a guest on numerous radio and television shows, including Fox News, Austin. she hosted The health revolution and Let’s stay healthy on Talk 1370 AM, KLBJ and The Wellness Connection podcast on Voice America. She has been the host and executive producer of three YouTube series: Awaken America; How the body works; and The Natural Way. She appeared in the internationally acclaimed film, Good heaven, which aired on CNN and was ranked among the Top 10 Documentaries at Sundance Film Festival and Netflix. It can now be viewed on Amazon Prime.

For more information, please visit www.radhiagleis.com, or follow the author on Twitter (@radhia_gleis).

  • Publisher: Sage Card Publishing
  • ISBN-10: 1737125803
  • ISBN-13: 978-1737125808
  • Available on Amazon.com, BN.com and Audible.com


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Sarah Ferguson Extends Book Contract | People https://stetmagazine.com/sarah-ferguson-extends-book-contract-people/ https://stetmagazine.com/sarah-ferguson-extends-book-contract-people/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 12:30:03 +0000 https://stetmagazine.com/sarah-ferguson-extends-book-contract-people/ Sarah Ferguson is going to write another Mills & Boon novel. The Duchess of York only released her debut book for romance editors, “Her Heart For A Compass,” earlier this week, but she’s really excited to extend their collaboration as she signed a contract for another. tome. Speaking on ‘Front Row’ on Radio 4, Sarah […]]]>





Sarah Ferguson is going to write another Mills & Boon novel.

The Duchess of York only released her debut book for romance editors, “Her Heart For A Compass,” earlier this week, but she’s really excited to extend their collaboration as she signed a contract for another. tome.

Speaking on ‘Front Row’ on Radio 4, Sarah – who wrote the book with co-author Margarete Kaye – said: “People are trying to put Fergie in a box, or Sarah or the Duchess in a box, saying ‘look at her, why is she doing this, why is she doing that?’

“We all have doubts about ourselves. But it was really exciting to grow together in friendship and collaboration and we are both very united together in this book ‘Her Heart For A Compass’. So, we have signed our next book agreement. “

The 61-year-old royal loosely based the novel on her ancestor Lady Magaret Montagu Douglas Scott and she revealed that the coronavirus pandemic has finally given her the opportunity to write a tale she has been preparing for more than 15 years.

She said: The pandemic also tapped me on the shoulder and said are you going to waste your life and never do what you wanna do?

“Are you going to be on the front lines helping people, nurses, NHS workers? I think Lady Margaret would have done it, she would have taken up the challenge.


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